Mac101 – Get one to one with your Mac ! http://mac.101.freemac.org Tue, 10 Jan 2017 11:49:57 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.6 MacBook Tips http://mac.101.freemac.org/macbook-tips/ Tue, 10 Jan 2017 11:49:57 +0000 http://osx.tips.onemac.net/?p=10875

Take a tour

Your MacBook has the following features built in:

Left side view of a MacBook, with a callout to the USB-C port.
  • USB-C port: Charge your computer, transfer data, connect to a display or projector, and more.
View of the right side of a MacBook, with callouts to the dual microphones and 3.5 mm headphone jack.
  • 3.5 mm headphone jack: Plug in stereo headphones or a digital 5.1 surround-sound speaker system and experience high-quality sound while watching movies or listening to your favorite music.
  • Dual microphones: Talk with friends or record audio.
Looking down at an open MacBook, with callouts to the FaceTime camera, power button, and Force Touch trackpad.
  • FaceTime camera: Make FaceTime video calls or take pictures and video. If the light is glowing, the camera is on. For more information, see FaceTime.
  • Power button: Press and hold for three seconds to turn your MacBook on or off, or press to put it to sleep.
  • Force Touch trackpad: Control your MacBook with gestures. The entire trackpad surface acts as a button so you can easily click anywhere. For more about using gestures, see Trackpad.
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Printing Tips http://mac.101.freemac.org/printing-tips/ Tue, 10 Jan 2017 10:16:04 +0000 http://mac.101.freemac.org/?p=10826

Print a document

  1. Open an item that you want to print, then choose Print from the File menu, or press Command-P.
  2. Choose your printer from the Printer pop-up menu, which lists nearby printers. You may need to wait a moment for the printer to appear in the menu.
    Print dialog
  3. Optionally change any of the other settings shown, such as the number of copies to print. Click Show Details to display additional settings that your printer or app supports. These settings vary depending on the printer and app you’re using. Click Hide Details to show just the most commonly used settings.
  4. To send the print job to your print queue, click Print.

Manage your print jobs

After you click Print, the print job goes to your print queue, which automatically sends the job to the printer. To open your print queue:

  • Click the icon of your printer in the Dock. The printer icon appears when the print queue contains jobs.
  • Or go to Apple menu > System Preferences, then click Printers & Scanners. Select your printer from the list, then click Open Print Queue.

Printer queue

You can take any of these actions from the print queue:

  • View status messages about your printer, such as “Printer is not connected.”
  • View jobs that are in progress, waiting to be printed, or couldn’t be printed because of a problem with the printer or its connection.
  • Pause, resume, or delete jobs.
  • View settings and other information about your printer, such as the printer’s name and supply levels.
  • Preview your document by double-clicking it or selecting it and pressing Space bar.

Learn more

For more information, click the question mark in the Print window or Printers & Scanners preferences.

Connect an AirPrint printer to a Wi-Fi network

You can connect an AirPrint printer to a Wi-Fi network for wireless printing from your Mac, iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch.

This general information isn’t specific to any particular AirPrint printer. For detailed steps, check the printer’s documentation or contact the printer’s manufacturer. All Wi-Fi printers need a properly configured Wi-Fi network and the name (or SSID) and password of that network.

If the printer has a built-in display

Printers with a touchscreen or other built-in display (control panel) generally expect you to use that display to select or enter the name and password of your Wi-Fi network. Check the printer’s documentation for details.

If the printer uses Wi-Fi Protected Setup (WPS)

If your Wi-Fi router isn’t made by Apple, check the router’s documentation for details about how to add a WPS printer.

If your Wi-Fi router is an AirPort Base Station:

  1. Open AirPort Utility, which is in the Utilities folder of your Applications folder.
  2. Select your base station in AirPort Utility, then enter the base station password, if prompted.
  3. From the menu bar, choose Base Station > Add WPS Printer.
  4. Select either “First attempt” or “PIN” as the type of WPS connection to allow. Then click Continue.
    • If you selected “First attempt,” push the WPS button on the printer. When the printer’s MAC Address appears in AirPort Utility, click Done.
    • If you selected “PIN,” enter the printer’s PIN number, which should be listed in the printer’s documentation. Then click Continue. When the printer’s MAC Address appears in AirPort Utility, click Done.
  5. Quit AirPort Utility.

If the printer can connect to your Mac via USB

You may be able to use a USB connection to set up Wi-Fi printing:

  1. Connect the printer to your Mac using the appropriate USB cable.
  2. Install the Mac software that came with the printer, and make sure that it includes a printer setup assistant.
  3. Use the printer setup assistant to connect the printer to your Wi-Fi network. Check the printer’s documentation for details.
  4. Disconnect the USB cable from the printer and Mac. The printer should remain connected to the Wi-Fi network.

If the printer can create an ad-hoc Wi-Fi network

You may be able to use the printer’s own ad-hoc Wi-Fi network to set up Wi-Fi printing:

  1. Install the Mac software that came with the printer, and make sure that it includes a printer setup assistant.
  2. Make sure that the printer’s ad-hoc Wi-Fi network is turned on. Check the printer’s documentation for details.
  3. Open the Wi-Fi menu on your Mac by clicking the Wi-Fi icon in the menu bar, then select the name of the printer’s ad-hoc Wi-Fi network. While your Mac is on the printer’s network, your Mac won’t be able to connect to the Internet or other services on your regular Wi-Fi network.
  4. Use the printer setup assistant to connect the printer to your Wi-Fi network. Check the printer’s documentation for details. The printer may restart before it connects to the network.
  5. Return to the Wi-Fi menu on your Mac and switch back to your Wi-Fi network.

Learn more

After the printer is connected to your Wi-Fi network, you’re ready to start printing:

Resolve printer issues on your Mac

Follow these steps if you can’t get your printer to work with your Mac.

These steps might help you to resolve printing issues such as these:

  • Your printer doesn’t appear in the Printer pop-up menu of Print dialogs.
  • Your printer doesn’t appear in Printers & Scanners preferences.
  • Your Mac displays a message that software for your device isn’t available.

If your Mac doesn’t see your printer or have the software for it

  1. Make sure that your printer is turned on and ready. For help with an error light or other error condition that appears on the printer itself, check the device’s documentation or contact the manufacturer.
  2. If your printer is connected to the USB port of your Mac, disconnect it.
  3. Check for software updates to make sure that your Mac has the latest information about your printer.
    Your Mac downloads software for most printers automatically, so it’s usually unnecessary to install software from the printer manufacturer. 
  4. If you disconnected your printer from the USB port in step 2, reconnect it now.
  5. From the Finder, choose Apple menu  > System Preferences, then click Printers & Scanners.
  6. Select your printer in the list of devices. You might need to wait a moment for it to appear.

If your printer doesn’t appear in Printers & Scanners preferences, click Add (+) at the bottom of the list, then choose the command to add a printer or scanner. The window that opens offers more ways to find your device:

Add Printer window

  • Default: Choose Default to display the list of printers connected to your Mac or discoverable on your local network. You can use the search field at the top of the window to narrow your search. 
  • IP: Choose IP if your device is connected to your network and you know the device’s IP address (or host name) and protocol. If you don’t have this information, ask your network administrator or check your device’s documentation.
  • Windows: Choose Windows if your device is connected to a PC using printer sharing, or to your network using the Windows SMB/CIFS protocol. You might first need to set up File Sharing to connect to the networked Windows resources.

If you still can’t see your printer or successfully add it, contact the printer manufacturer for support.

If your Mac has some other issue with your printer or scanner

These steps might resolve printing issues that have no other clear cause.

  1. Choose Apple menu  > System Preferences, then click Printers & Scanners.
  2. Select your printer or scanner in the list of devices, then click Delete (–) to remove it from the list.
  3. Follow the steps in the previous section to add your printer again.
  4. If the issue persists, Control-click anywhere in the list of devices in Printers & Scanners preferences. Then choose “Reset printing system” from the shortcut menu that appears.
    Resetting the printing system causes all printers and scanners—including their queues, jobs, and custom settings—to be removed from Printers & Scanners preferences.
  5. Follow the steps in the previous section to add your device again.

If the issue remains unresolved, take these final steps to remove any currently installed printer drivers that could be causing the issue:

  1. Choose Apple menu  > System Preferences, then click Printers & Scanners.
  2. Control-click anywhere in the list of devices, then choose “Reset printing system” from the shortcut menu that appears.
  3. From the Finder, choose Go > Go to Folder. Type /Library/Printers/ and click Go.
  4. The Printers folder opens. Choose Edit > Select All to select all items in the folder.
  5. Choose File > New Folder with Selection to put all of the selected items into a new folder named New Folder With Items.
    To save storage space, you can delete the New Folder With Items folder after completing the remaining steps.
  6. Follow the steps in the previous section once more.

If your printing issue persists, contact the printer manufacturer for support.

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Password Tips http://mac.101.freemac.org/password-tips/ Tue, 10 Jan 2017 10:13:50 +0000 http://mac.101.freemac.org/?p=10824 Change or reset the password of a macOS user account

You can change the password that you use to log in to your Mac, or reset the password if you don’t remember it.

The password of your macOS user account is also known as your login password. It’s the password that you use to log in to your Mac and make certain changes, such as installing software.

Change your password

If you know your password and can use it to log in to your account, you can change your password in Users & Groups preferences:

  1. Choose System Preferences from the Apple menu, then click Users & Groups.
  2. Select your user name from the list of users.
  3. Click the Change Password button, then follow the onscreen instructions. If you’re using a password hint, remember to update the hint  for your new password.

Reset your password

If you don’t remember your password, or it isn’t working, you might be able to reset it using one of the methods described below. But first try these simpler solutions:

  • Make sure that you’re typing the correct uppercase or lowercase characters. If your keyboard has Caps Lock turned on, the password field shows a Caps Lock symbol Upward-pointing arrow.
  • If the password field shows a question mark, click it to display a password hint that might help you to remember.
  • Try to log in without a password. If that works, you can then add a password by following the steps to change your password.
  • Try to log in with the Apple ID password that you use for iCloud. If you just changed that password and the new password isn’t working, try the old password first. If that works, you should be able to use the new password from then on.

Reset using your Apple ID

In some macOS versions, you can use your Apple ID to reset your login password. At the login screen, keep entering a password until you see a message saying that you can reset your password using Apple ID. If you don’t see the message after three attempts, your account isn’t set up to allow resetting with Apple ID.

  1. Click the arrow button next to the Apple ID message, then follow the onscreen instructions to enter your Apple ID and create a new password. You’ll be asked to restart when done.
  2. Log in with your new password.
  3. Create a new login keychain.

Reset using another admin account

If you know the name and password of an admin account on your Mac, you can use that account to reset the password.

  1. Log in with the name and password of the other admin account.
  2. Choose System Preferences from the Apple menu, then click Users & Groups.
  3. Click the Lock button  closed lock, then enter the admin name and password again.
  4. Select your user name from the list of users.
  5. Click the Reset Password button, then follow the onscreen instructions to create a new password:
    Change Password window
  6. Choose Log Out from the Apple menu.
  7. Log in to your account using your new password.
  8. Create a new login keychain.

Reset using the Reset Password assistant (FileVault must be on)

If FileVault is turned on, you might be able to reset your password using the Reset Password assistant:

  1. Wait up to a minute at the login screen, until you see a message saying that you can use the power button on your Mac to shut down and start up again in Recovery OS. If you don’t see this message, FileVault isn’t on.
  2. Press and hold the power button until your Mac turns off.
  3. Press the power button again to turn on your Mac.
  4. When the Reset Password window appears, follow the onscreen instructions to create a new password.
    If you need to connect to Wi-Fi, move your pointer to the top of the screen and use the Wi-Fi menu   to connect. To exit without resetting your password, choose Apple menu > Restart.
    Reset Password assistant window
  5. When done, click Restart.
  6. If you were able to reset your password with the Reset Password assistant, log in to your account using your new password.
  7. Create a new login keychain.

Reset using your Recovery Key (FileVault must be on)

If FileVault is turned on and you have a FileVault Recovery Key, you can use that key to reset your password.

  1. At the login screen, keep entering a password until you see a message saying that you can reset your password using your Recovery Key. If you don’t see the message after three attempts, FileVault isn’t on.
  2. Click the arrow button next to the message. The password field changes to a Recovery Key field.
  3. Enter your Recovery Key, then follow the onscreen instructions to create a new password. Click Reset Password when done.
  4. Create a new login keychain.

Create a new login keychain

After resetting your password and logging back in to your account, you might see an alert that the system was unable to unlock your login keychain. This is expected, because the passwords for your user account and login keychain no longer match. Just click the Create New Keychain button.

If you didn’t see an alert about your login keychain, or you see other messages asking for your old password, reset your keychain manually:

  1. Open Keychain Access, which is in the Utilities folder of your Applications folder.
  2. Choose Preferences from the Keychain Access menu, then click the Reset My Default Keychain button in the preferences window. After you enter your new password, Keychain Access creates an empty login keychain with no password. Click OK to confirm.

    If you don’t see a Reset My Default keychain button, close the preferences window and select the “login” keychain from the left side of the Keychain Access window. Press the Delete key, then click Delete References.

  3. Choose Log Out from the Apple menu to return to the login screen.
  4. Log in to your account using your new password. Your account password and login keychain password now match again.
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Mac mini Tips http://mac.101.freemac.org/mac-mini-tips/ Tue, 10 Jan 2017 10:11:33 +0000 http://osx.tips.onemac.net/?p=10872

Set up your new Mac mini

Use these basic setup steps to get your new Mac mini up and running.

Check for an Internet connection

It’s best to set up your Mac mini somewhere that has a Wi-Fi network or other connection to the Internet. Your Mac mini will use that connection to complete certain setup steps. If the network requires a password, have the password ready.

Plug in only the essential devices

If you’re using an external keyboard and trackpad or mouse, turn them on or plug them into your Mac mini. If you’re using an external display, plug it in and turn it on as well, but don’t connect any other peripherals yet. And of course plug in your Mac mini.

If you’ve never used a trackpad before, here’s a tip: To click, press down or tap on the trackpad surface.

Turn on your Mac mini

Some Mac notebooks automatically start up when you connect the computer to power or open its lid. On other Mac computers, press the power button to start up.

Use the setup assistant

A series of windows will ask you for setup details, such as your Apple ID. If you’ve used iTunes or have an iPhone or iPad, you already have an Apple ID. Use the same Apple ID on your Mac mini.

We recommend that you let the setup assistant turn on FileVaultiCloud Keychain, and Find My Mac. You can also let it transfer information from another computer or Time Machine backup, or you can do that later using Migration Assistant.

You’ll be asked to create the name and password of your computer account. You’ll need this information to log in to your Mac mini, change certain settings, and install software.

Check for software updates

When the setup assistant finishes setting up your Mac mini, you’ll see your Mac desktop, the Finder menu bar, and the Dock.

Click App Store in the Dock, then find and install any software updates. After your software is up to date, you can connect any printers or other peripherals and begin using your Mac mini.

Using 4K displays, 5K displays, and Ultra HD TVs with your Mac

Learn about Mac support for 4K displays, 5K displays, and Ultra HD TVs. Also learn about the system requirements and how to set up and adjust the display or TV.

Supported displays and configurations

You can use 4K displays and Ultra HD TVs with these Mac computers:

  • MacBook Pro (Retina, Late 2013) and later
  • Mac Pro (Late 2013)
  • iMac (27-inch, Late 2013) and later
  • Mac mini (Late 2014)
  • MacBook Air (Early 2015)
  • MacBook (Retina, 12-inch, Early 2015) and later

HDMI

You can use 4K displays and Ultra HD TVs at the following resolutions and refresh rates via the built-in HDMI port of your Mac:

  • 3840×2160 at 30 Hz refresh rate
  • 4096×2160 at 24 Hz refresh rate (mirroring is not supported at this resolution)

MacBook (Retina, 12-inch, Early 2015) and later, as well as late-2016 MacBook Pro models, support these resolutions and refresh rates over HDMI 1.4b using the USB-C Digital AV Multiport Adapter:

  • 3840×2160 at 30 Hz refresh rate
  • 4096×2160 at 24 Hz refresh rate (mirroring is not supported at this resolution)

MacBook (Retina, 12-inch, Early 2016) and late-2016 MacBook Pro models support 60Hz refresh rates over HDMI when used with a supported HDMI 2.0 display, an HDMI Premium Certified cable, and a supported USB-C to HDMI 2.0 adapter.

Single-Stream (SST) displays

Most single-stream 4K displays are supported at 30Hz operation.

With OS X Yosemite v10.10.3 and later, most single-stream 4K (3840×2160) displays are supported at 60Hz operation on the following Mac computers:

  • MacBook Pro (Retina, 13-inch, Early 2015) and later
  • MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Mid 2014) and later
  • Mac Pro (Late 2013)
  • iMac (27-inch, Late 2013) and later
  • MacBook Air (Early 2015)

With OS X Yosemite v10.10.3 and later, most single-stream 4K (4096×2160) displays are supported at 60Hz operation on the following Mac computers:

  • MacBook Pro (15-inch, Late 2016)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, Late 2016, Four Thunderbolt 3 Ports)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, Late 2016, Two Thunderbolt 3 Ports)
  • Mac Pro (Late 2013)
  • iMac (Retina 5K, 27-inch, Late 2014) and later

With macOS Sierra, MacBook (Retina, 12-inch, Early 2015) and later supports 4K (3840×2160) displays at 60Hz operation over DisplayPort.

Multi-Stream Transport (MST) Displays

These Mac computers support multi-stream transport (MST) displays at 60 Hz:

  • MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Late 2013) and later
  • MacBook Pro (Retina, 13-inch, Early 2015) and later
  • Mac Pro (Late 2013)
  • iMac (Retina 5K, 27-inch, Late 2014) and later

If you use a 60Hz MST display with the MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Mid 2015) with AMD Radeon R9 M370X graphics card or iMac (Retina 5K, 27-inch, Late 2014), only one additional Thunderbolt display can be supported. Learn more about Thunderbolt ports and displays.

You need to manually configure 4K displays to use MST. Follow the steps below to use the display’s built-in controls to enable this feature.

  • Sharp PN-K321: Choose Menu > Setup > DisplayPort STREAM > MST > SET
  • ASUS PQ321Q: Choose OSD menu > Setup > DisplayPort Stream
  • Dell UP2414Q and UP3214Q: Choose Menu > Display Setting > DisplayPort 1.2 > Enable
  • Panasonic TC-L65WT600: Choose Menu > Display Port Settings > Stream Setting > Auto

If your specific DisplayPort display is not listed above, check with the display’s manufacturer for compatibility information.

Your Mac will automatically detect an MST-enabled display. However, your display might require a firmware update to support 60Hz operation. Contact your display’s manufacturer for details.

Dual-Cable Displays

Some displays with resolutions higher than 4K require two DisplayPort cables to connect the display at full resolution:

  • The Dell UP2715K 27-inch 5K display is supported by iMac (Retina 5K, 27-inch, Late 2014) and later and Mac Pro (Late 2013) running OS X Yosemite v10.10.3 and later.
  • The HP Z27q 5K display is supported by iMac (Retina 5K, 27-inch, Late 2014) and later and Mac Pro (Late 2013) running macOS Sierra.

LG UltraFine Displays

The LG UltraFine 4K Display is supported on these Mac computers with DisplayPort Alt-Mode over USB-C:

  • MacBook Pro (15-inch, Late 2016)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, Late 2016, Four Thunderbolt 3 Ports)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, Late 2016, Two Thunderbolt 3 Ports)
  • MacBook (Retina, 12-inch, Early 2015) and later

The LG UltraFine 5K Display is supported on these Mac computers with Thunderbolt 3:

  • MacBook Pro (15-inch, Late 2016)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, Late 2016, Four Thunderbolt 3 Ports)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, Late 2016, Two Thunderbolt 3 Ports)

Adjusting your display

Use System Preferences > Displays to adjust or scale the resolution on your display. This can make text and objects appear larger or give you more space on your screen.

Hover your mouse over one of the resolution options to see more detail on that option. To get a Detect Displays button to appear, press the Option key. To see all the available resolutions, hold down the Option key while clicking the Scaled button.

If you change display resolutions when mirroring to a 4K display or Ultra HD TV, some distortion can occur. Turn mirroring off and back on to correct this.

To get the best graphics performance from your 4K display, connect the display or its adapter directly to your Mac, instead of connecting through another peripheral or device.

Print from your Mac mini

Learn how to print pictures and other documents from your Mac mini to a printer.

Print a document

  1. Open an item that you want to print, then choose Print from the File menu, or press Command-P.
  2. Choose your printer from the Printer pop-up menu, which lists nearby printers. You may need to wait a moment for the printer to appear in the menu.
    Print dialog
  3. Optionally change any of the other settings shown, such as the number of copies to print. Click Show Details to display additional settings that your printer or app supports. These settings vary depending on the printer and app you’re using. Click Hide Details to show just the most commonly used settings.
  4. To send the print job to your print queue, click Print.

Manage your print jobs

After you click Print, the print job goes to your print queue, which automatically sends the job to the printer. To open your print queue:

  • Click the icon of your printer in the Dock. The printer icon appears when the print queue contains jobs.
  • Or go to Apple menu > System Preferences, then click Printers & Scanners. Select your printer from the list, then click Open Print Queue.

Printer queue

You can take any of these actions from the print queue:

  • View status messages about your printer, such as “Printer is not connected.”
  • View jobs that are in progress, waiting to be printed, or couldn’t be printed because of a problem with the printer or its connection.
  • Pause, resume, or delete jobs.
  • View settings and other information about your printer, such as the printer’s name and supply levels.
  • Preview your document by double-clicking it or selecting it and pressing Space bar.

Learn more

For more information, click the question mark in the Print window or Printers & Scanners preferences.

Connect an AirPrint printer to a Wi-Fi network

You can connect an AirPrint printer to a Wi-Fi network for wireless printing from your Mac, iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch.

This general information isn’t specific to any particular AirPrint printer. For detailed steps, check the printer’s documentation or contact the printer’s manufacturer. All Wi-Fi printers need a properly configured Wi-Fi network and the name (or SSID) and password of that network.

If the printer has a built-in display

Printers with a touchscreen or other built-in display (control panel) generally expect you to use that display to select or enter the name and password of your Wi-Fi network. Check the printer’s documentation for details.

If the printer uses Wi-Fi Protected Setup (WPS)

If your Wi-Fi router isn’t made by Apple, check the router’s documentation for details about how to add a WPS printer.

If your Wi-Fi router is an AirPort Base Station:

  1. Open AirPort Utility, which is in the Utilities folder of your Applications folder.
  2. Select your base station in AirPort Utility, then enter the base station password, if prompted.
  3. From the menu bar, choose Base Station > Add WPS Printer.
  4. Select either “First attempt” or “PIN” as the type of WPS connection to allow. Then click Continue.
    • If you selected “First attempt,” push the WPS button on the printer. When the printer’s MAC Address appears in AirPort Utility, click Done.
    • If you selected “PIN,” enter the printer’s PIN number, which should be listed in the printer’s documentation. Then click Continue. When the printer’s MAC Address appears in AirPort Utility, click Done.
  5. Quit AirPort Utility.

If the printer can connect to your Mac mini via USB

You may be able to use a USB connection to set up Wi-Fi printing:

  1. Connect the printer to your Mac mini using the appropriate USB cable.
  2. Install the Mac software that came with the printer, and make sure that it includes a printer setup assistant.
  3. Use the printer setup assistant to connect the printer to your Wi-Fi network. Check the printer’s documentation for details.
  4. Disconnect the USB cable from the printer and Mac. The printer should remain connected to the Wi-Fi network.

If the printer can create an ad-hoc Wi-Fi network

You may be able to use the printer’s own ad-hoc Wi-Fi network to set up Wi-Fi printing:

  1. Install the Mac software that came with the printer, and make sure that it includes a printer setup assistant.
  2. Make sure that the printer’s ad-hoc Wi-Fi network is turned on. Check the printer’s documentation for details.
  3. Open the Wi-Fi menu on your Mac by clicking the Wi-Fi icon in the menu bar, then select the name of the printer’s ad-hoc Wi-Fi network. While your Mac is on the printer’s network, your Mac won’t be able to connect to the Internet or other services on your regular Wi-Fi network.
  4. Use the printer setup assistant to connect the printer to your Wi-Fi network. Check the printer’s documentation for details. The printer may restart before it connects to the network.
  5. Return to the Wi-Fi menu on your Mac and switch back to your Wi-Fi network.

Learn more

After the printer is connected to your Wi-Fi network, you’re ready to start printing:

Resolve printer issues on your Mac

Follow these steps if you can’t get your printer to work with your Mac.

These steps might help you to resolve printing issues such as these:

  • Your printer doesn’t appear in the Printer pop-up menu of Print dialogs.
  • Your printer doesn’t appear in Printers & Scanners preferences.
  • Your Mac displays a message that software for your device isn’t available.

If your Mac doesn’t see your printer or have the software for it

  1. Make sure that your printer is turned on and ready. For help with an error light or other error condition that appears on the printer itself, check the device’s documentation or contact the manufacturer.
  2. If your printer is connected to the USB port of your Mac, disconnect it.
  3. Check for software updates to make sure that your Mac has the latest information about your printer.
    Your Mac downloads software for most printers automatically, so it’s usually unnecessary to install software from the printer manufacturer. 
  4. If you disconnected your printer from the USB port in step 2, reconnect it now.
  5. From the Finder, choose Apple menu  > System Preferences, then click Printers & Scanners.
  6. Select your printer in the list of devices. You might need to wait a moment for it to appear.

If your printer doesn’t appear in Printers & Scanners preferences, click Add (+) at the bottom of the list, then choose the command to add a printer or scanner. The window that opens offers more ways to find your device:

Add Printer window

  • Default: Choose Default to display the list of printers connected to your Mac or discoverable on your local network. You can use the search field at the top of the window to narrow your search. 
  • IP: Choose IP if your device is connected to your network and you know the device’s IP address (or host name) and protocol. If you don’t have this information, ask your network administrator or check your device’s documentation.
  • Windows: Choose Windows if your device is connected to a PC using printer sharing, or to your network using the Windows SMB/CIFS protocol. You might first need to set up File Sharing to connect to the networked Windows resources.

If you still can’t see your printer or successfully add it, contact the printer manufacturer for support.

If your Mac has some other issue with your printer or scanner

These steps might resolve printing issues that have no other clear cause.

  1. Choose Apple menu  > System Preferences, then click Printers & Scanners.
  2. Select your printer or scanner in the list of devices, then click Delete (–) to remove it from the list.
  3. Follow the steps in the previous section to add your printer again.
  4. If the issue persists, Control-click anywhere in the list of devices in Printers & Scanners preferences. Then choose “Reset printing system” from the shortcut menu that appears.
    Resetting the printing system causes all printers and scanners—including their queues, jobs, and custom settings—to be removed from Printers & Scanners preferences.
  5. Follow the steps in the previous section to add your device again.

If the issue remains unresolved, take these final steps to remove any currently installed printer drivers that could be causing the issue:

  1. Choose Apple menu  > System Preferences, then click Printers & Scanners.
  2. Control-click anywhere in the list of devices, then choose “Reset printing system” from the shortcut menu that appears.
  3. From the Finder, choose Go > Go to Folder. Type /Library/Printers/ and click Go.
  4. The Printers folder opens. Choose Edit > Select All to select all items in the folder.
  5. Choose File > New Folder with Selection to put all of the selected items into a new folder named New Folder With Items.
    To save storage space, you can delete the New Folder With Items folder after completing the remaining steps.
  6. Follow the steps in the previous section once more.

If your printing issue persists, contact the printer manufacturer for support.

How to remove or install memory

Learn how to remove or install memory into your Mac mini computer.

General

To minimize the possibility of damage to the computer components due to static discharge, it’s important to wear an antistatic wrist strap while you work with your computer’s memory.

Choose your model

If you need help determining which Mac mini you have, use the information in How to identify Mac mini models.

Applicable models

  • Mac mini (Late 2014)

Mac mini (Late 2014) does not have user-installable RAM. You can configure the memory in your Mac mini (Late 2014) when you purchase it.

Applicable models

  • Mac mini (Late 2012)
  • Mac mini (Mid 2011)
  • Mac mini (Mid 2010)

Memory specifications

This Mac mini has these memory specifications:

Number of memory slots 2
Maximum memory
  • 16 GB for Mac mini (Late 2012)
  • 8 GB for Mac mini (Mid 2011) and Mac mini (Mid 2010)
Memory card specifications
Additional notes For best performance, don’t mix sizes of memory modules. Install two identical memory modules.

  • A pair of 2 GB, 4 GB, or 8 GB memory modules for Mac mini (Late 2012).
  • A pair of 1 GB, 2 GB, or 4 GB memory modules for Mac mini (Mid 2010) and Mac mini (Mid 2011).

Removing or installing memory

Warning: Always shut down your Mac mini and remove the power cord before installing memory. Do not install memory while your Mac mini is plugged in.

Step 1: Remove the bottom cover

  1. Turn off your Mac mini. From the Apple menu (), choose Shut Down.
  2. Disconnect all cables. Disconnect the power cord and all other cables from your Mac mini.
  3. Lay your Mac mini upside down on a soft cloth or towel, and then rotate the bottom cover counterclockwise to the unlocked position.

  4. Press on the cover to pop up the opposite side, and then remove the cover.

Step 2: Remove the original memory modules

  1. Gently spread the clips at the ends of the top memory module just enough to let the free edge pop up.

  2. Pull the module out of the slot.

  3. Repeat to remove the second, bottom module.

Step 3: Install the new modules

  1. Carefully press the notched edge of the new memory module into the bottom slot while keeping the opposite edge slightly raised.

  2. Press down on the raised edge until the clips snap into place.

  3. Repeat to install the top memory module.

Step 4: Replace the bottom cover

Warning: Don’t connect the power cord or turn on your Mac mini until you replace the bottom cover. Never operate your Mac mini without the cover in place.

  1. Replace the bottom cover using the alignment dots to place it in the unlocked position.

  2. Rotate the cover clockwise to lock it in place.

  3. Reconnect the power cord and any other cables you disconnected.

Back to top

Applicable models

  • Mac mini (Late 2009)
  • Mac mini (Early 2009)

Memory specifications

These Mac mini models have these memory specifications:

Number of memory slots 2
Base memory Configure to order (CTO) to its maximum SDRAM configuration
Maximum memory 4 GB
Memory card specifications Compatible:
– Small Outline Dual Inline Memory Module (SO-DIMM) format
– 1066 MHz PC3-8500, DDR3
– Unbuffered
– Non-parity
– 204-pin
Not compatible:
– Registers or buffers
– PLLs
– ECC
– Parity
– EDO RAM
Additional notes For best performance, don’t mix sizes; always install two identical memory modules (a pair of 1 GB or 2 GB memory modules).

 

Removing or installing memory

Important: You should not manually upgrade or replace the memory in these Mac mini models. Instead, contact an Apple Authorized Service Provider to install memory for you.

Back to top

Applicable models

  • Mac mini (Mid 2007)
  • Mac mini (Late 2006)
  • Mac mini (Early 2006)

Memory specifications

These Mac mini models have these memory specifications:

Number of memory slots 2
Base memory Configure to order; at least 512 MB or DDR2 SDRAM (one 256 MB SO-DIMM in each slot)
Maximum memory 2 GB
Memory card specifications Compatible:

  • Small Outline Dual Inline Memory Module (SO-DIMM) format.
  • 667 MHz, PC2-5300, DDR2 compliant.
  • Unbuffered
  • Nonparity
  • 200-pin
Not compatible:

  • Registers or buffers
  • PLLs
  • ECC
  • Parity
  • EDO RAM
Additional notes For best performance, use two SO-DIMMs (one in each slot) of the same DIMM size (example: two 512 MB SO-DIMMs).

Removing or installing memory

You should not manually upgrade or replace the memory in these Mac mini models. Instead, contact an Apple Authorized Service Provider or Apple Retail Store to install memory for you.

Back to top

Learn more

Checking that your computer recognizes the new memory

To check that the computer recognizes the new memory:

  1. Start up your computer.
  2. When you see the Mac OS X desktop, choose Apple () from the upper-left menu bar, then choose About This Mac.

The total memory includes the amount of memory that originally came with the computer plus the new memory you added, or if all the memory has been replaced, the new total for that memory. For detailed information about the amount of memory installed in your computer, open System Profiler by choosing Apple (), then About This Mac. Click More Info and then Memory from the Hardware section that appears in System Profiler.

If the reported memory size isn’t correct or if your Mac mini repeatedly plays three tones, it may be having trouble recognizing a memory module. If this happens, shut down your Mac mini, verify the module specifications against the requirements listed above, and then repeat the memory installation instructions to make sure the modules are installed correctly. If you still have issues, remove the memory and consult the support information that came with the memory, or contact the vendor who provided the memory.

Mac mini (Late 2014) – Technical Specifications

Processor

  • 1.4GHz
    1.4GHz dual-core Intel Core i5 (Turbo Boost up to 2.7GHz) with 3MB on-chip shared L3 cache
  • 2.6GHz
    2.6GHz dual-core Intel Core i5 (Turbo Boost up to 3.1GHz) with 3MB on-chip shared L3 cache
    Configurable to 3.0GHz dual-core Intel Core i7 (Turbo Boost up to 3.5GHz) with 4MB on-chip shared L3 cache.
  • 2.8GHz
    2.8GHz dual-core Intel Core i5 (Turbo Boost up to 3.3GHz) with 3MB on-chip shared L3 cache
    Configurable to 3.0GHz dual-core Intel Core i7 (Turbo Boost up to 3.5GHz) with 4MB on-chip shared L3 cache.

Storage1

  • 1.4GHz
    500GB (5400-rpm) hard drive
    Configurable to 1TB Fusion Drive.
  • 2.6GHz
    1TB (5400-rpm) hard drive
    Configurable to 1TB Fusion Drive or 256GB of flash storage (SSD).
  • 2.8GHz
    1TB Fusion Drive
    Configurable to 2TB Fusion Drive or 256GB, 512GB or 1TB of flash storage (SSD).

Memory

  • 1.4GHz
    4GB of 1600MHz LPDDR3 memory
    Configurable to 8GB or 16GB.
  • 2.6GHz
    8GB of 1600MHz LPDDR3 memory
    Configurable to 16GB.
  • 2.8GHz
    8GB of 1600MHz LPDDR3 memory
    Configurable to 16GB.

Graphics

  • 1.4GHz
    Intel HD Graphics 5000
  • 2.6GHz
    Intel Iris Graphics
  • 2.8GHz
    Intel Iris Graphics

Size

  • Height: 1.4 inches (3.6 cm)
  • Width: 7.7 inches (19.7 cm)
  • Depth: 7.7 inches (19.7 cm)

Weight2

  • 1.4GHz
    2.6 pounds (1.19 kg)
  • 2.6GHz
    2.6 pounds (1.20 kg)
  • 2.8GHz
    2.7 pounds (1.22 kg)

Video Support

  • Support for up to two displays at 2560 by 1600 pixels, both at millions of colors
  • Thunderbolt digital video output
    • Native Mini DisplayPort output
    • DVI output using Mini DisplayPort to DVI Adapter (sold separately)
    • VGA output using Mini DisplayPort to VGA Adapter (sold separately)
    • Dual-link DVI output using Mini DisplayPort to Dual-Link DVI Adapter (sold separately)
  • HDMI video output
    • Support for 1080p resolution at up to 60Hz
    • Support for 3840-by-2160 resolution at 30Hz
    • Support for 4096-by-2160 resolution at 24Hz
  • DVI output using HDMI to DVI Adapter (sold separately)

Audio

  • Audio line in minijack (digital/analog)
  • Audio line out/3.5 mm headphone jack (digital/analog)
  • HDMI port supports multichannel audio output
  • Support for Apple iPhone headset with microphone
  • Built-in speaker

Connections and Expansions

  • Two Thunderbolt 2 ports (up to 20 Gbps)
  • Four USB 3 ports (up to 5 Gbps)
  • HDMI port
  • SDXC card slot
  • Gigabit Ethernet port
  • Audio in port
  • 3.5 mm headphone jack
  • IR receiver

Communications

  • Wi-Fi
    802.11ac Wi-Fi wireless networking; IEEE 802.11a/g/b/n compatible
  • Bluetooth
    Bluetooth 4.0 wireless technology
  • Ethernet
    10/100/1000BASE-T Ethernet (RJ-45 connector)

Electrical and Operating Requirements

  • Line voltage: 100-240V AC
  • Frequency: 50Hz to 60Hz, single phase
  • Maximum continuous power: 85W
  • Operating temperature: 50° to 95° F (10° to 35° C)
  • Storage temperature: -40° to 116° F (-40° to 47° C)
  • Relative humidity: 5% to 95% noncondensing
  • Operating altitude: tested up to 10,000 feet
  • Typical acoustical performance: Sound pressure level (operator position): 12dBA at idle3

Limited Warranty and Service

Your Mac mini comes with 90 days of free telephone support and a one-year limited warranty. Purchase theAppleCare Protection Plan to extend your service and support to three years from your computer’s purchase date. Only the AppleCare Protection Plan provides you with direct telephone support from Apple technical experts and the assurance that repairs will be handled by Apple-authorized technicians using genuine Apple parts. For more information, visit Apple Support or call 800-823-2775.

In the Box

  • Mac mini
  • Power cord

Operating System

OS X El Capitan
Engineered to take full advantage of your Mac hardware, OS X El Capitan is designed to be as easy to use as it is beautiful to look at. It comes with an amazing collection of apps you’ll use — and love — every day. And it enables your Mac and iOS devices to work wonderfully together. Learn more

Built-in Apps4

  • Photos
  • iMovie
  • GarageBand
  • Pages
  • Numbers
  • Keynote
  • Safari
  • Mail
  • Messages
  • FaceTime
  • Calendar
  • Notes
  • App Store
  • iTunes
  • iBooks
  • Maps
  • Contacts
  • Reminders

Learn more

Configure to Order

  • 1.4GHz
    • 8GB LPDDR3 memory
    • 16GB LPDDR3 memory
    • 1TB Fusion Drive
    • Apple Remote
  • 2.6GHz
    • 16GB LPDDR3 memory
    • 3.0GHz dual-core Intel Core i7 processor
    • 1TB Fusion Drive
    • 256GB flash storage (SSD)
    • Apple Remote
  • 2.8GHz
    • 16GB LPDDR3 memory
    • 3.0GHz dual-core Intel Core i7 processor
    • 2TB Fusion Drive
    • 256GB flash storage (SSD)
    • 512GB flash storage (SSD)
    • 1TB flash storage (SSD)
    • Apple Remote

Configure your Mac mini with these options, only at the Apple Online Store.

Mac mini and the Environment

Apple takes a complete product life cycle approach to determining our environmental impact. Learn more

Mac mini is designed with the following features to reduce its environmental impact:

  • BFR-free
  • PVC-free5
  • Highly recyclable aluminum enclosure
  • Meets ENERGY STAR 6.1 requirements
  • Rated EPEAT Gold6

Apple and the Environment
Learn more about Apple’s dedication to reducing the environmental impact of our products and process. Or read our Product Environmental Reports for detailed information on the environmental performance of every Apple product.

Recycling
Apple takes a holistic view of materials management and waste minimization. Learn more about how to recycle your Mac.

Acoustic Performance

Declared noise emission values in accordance with ECMA-109

Sound Power Level
LWA,m (B)
Sound Pressure Level
Operator Position
LpA,m (dB)
Idle 1.90 (Kv=0.25) 12.0
Wireless web 1.90 (Kv=0.25) 11.5
Hard drive seek 1.95 (Kv=0.25) 12.0
  1. LWA,m is the mean A-weighted sound power level, rounded to the nearest 0.05 B.
  2. LpA,m is the mean A-weighted sound pressure level measured at the operator position (rounded to the nearest 0.5 dB).
  3. 1 B (bel) = 10 dB (decibel)
  4. KV is the statistical adder for computing upper-limit of A-weighted sound power level.
  5. The quantity, LWA,c (formerly called LWAd) may be computed from the sum of LWA,m and KV.
  6. The Wireless web test browses 25 popular websites.
  7. Configuration tested: 2.8GHz dual-core Intel Core i5 processor, 8GB memory, 1TB Fusion Drive, Intel Iris graphics.

Accessories

AirPort and Wireless

  • AirPort Express
  • AirPort Extreme
  • AirPort Time Capsule
  • Magic Keyboard
  • Magic Mouse 2
  • Magic Trackpad 2

Displays and Graphics

  • Apple Thunderbolt Display
  • Apple HDMI to DVI Adapter
  • Apple Mini DisplayPort to DVI Adapter
  • Apple Mini DisplayPort to VGA Adapter
  • Apple Mini DisplayPort to Dual-Link DVI Adapter

Mac Software

  • Aperture
  • Logic Pro X
  • Final Cut Pro X

Other Accessories

  • Apple USB SuperDrive
  • AppleCare Protection Plan

  1. 1GB = 1 billion bytes and 1TB = 1 trillion bytes; actual formatted capacity less.
  2. Weight varies by configuration and manufacturing process.
  3. Acoustics measured from typical operator position sitting in front of standard Mac mini system. Acoustics may vary by configuration.
  4. 4. Pages, Numbers, and Keynote are free on the Mac App Store for qualifying Mac computers purchased on or after October 1, 2013. OS X Yosemite or later required. Downloading apps requires an Apple ID.
  5. PVC-free AC power cord available in all regions except India and South Korea.
  6. Mac mini achieved a Gold rating from EPEAT in the U.S. and Canada.
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Mac Pro Tips http://mac.101.freemac.org/mac-pro-tips/ Mon, 09 Jan 2017 12:38:36 +0000 http://osx.tips.onemac.net/?p=10869

Set up your new Mac

Use these basic setup steps to get your new Mac up and running.

 

Check for an Internet connection

It’s best to set up your Mac somewhere that has a Wi-Fi network or other connection to the Internet. Your Mac will use that connection to complete certain setup steps. If the network requires a password, have the password ready.

Plug in only the essential devices

If you’re using an external keyboard and trackpad or mouse, turn them on or plug them into your Mac. If you’re using an external display, plug it in and turn it on as well, but don’t connect any other peripherals yet. And of course plug in your Mac.

If you’ve never used a trackpad before, here’s a tip: To click, press down or tap on the trackpad surface.

Turn on your Mac

Some Mac notebooks automatically start up when you connect the computer to power or open its lid. On other Mac computers, press the power button to start up.

Use the setup assistant

A series of windows will ask you for setup details, such as your Apple ID. If you’ve used iTunes or have an iPhone or iPad, you already have an Apple ID. Use the same Apple ID on your Mac.

We recommend that you let the setup assistant turn on FileVaultiCloud Keychain, and Find My Mac. You can also let it transfer information from another computer or Time Machine backup, or you can do that later using Migration Assistant.

You’ll be asked to create the name and password of your computer account. You’ll need this information to log in to your Mac, change certain settings, and install software.

Check for software updates

When the setup assistant finishes setting up your Mac, you’ll see your Mac desktop, the Finder menu bar, and the Dock.

Click App Store in the Dock, then find and install any software updates. After your software is up to date, you can connect any printers or other peripherals and begin using your Mac.

Using 4K displays, 5K displays, and Ultra HD TVs with your Mac

Learn about Mac support for 4K displays, 5K displays, and Ultra HD TVs. Also learn about the system requirements and how to set up and adjust the display or TV.

Supported displays and configurations

You can use 4K displays and Ultra HD TVs with these Mac computers:

  • MacBook Pro (Retina, Late 2013) and later
  • Mac Pro (Late 2013)
  • iMac (27-inch, Late 2013) and later
  • Mac mini (Late 2014)
  • MacBook Air (Early 2015)
  • MacBook (Retina, 12-inch, Early 2015) and later

HDMI

You can use 4K displays and Ultra HD TVs at the following resolutions and refresh rates via the built-in HDMI port of your Mac:

  • 3840×2160 at 30 Hz refresh rate
  • 4096×2160 at 24 Hz refresh rate (mirroring is not supported at this resolution)

MacBook (Retina, 12-inch, Early 2015) and later, as well as late-2016 MacBook Pro models, support these resolutions and refresh rates over HDMI 1.4b using the USB-C Digital AV Multiport Adapter:

  • 3840×2160 at 30 Hz refresh rate
  • 4096×2160 at 24 Hz refresh rate (mirroring is not supported at this resolution)

MacBook (Retina, 12-inch, Early 2016) and late-2016 MacBook Pro models support 60Hz refresh rates over HDMI when used with a supported HDMI 2.0 display, an HDMI Premium Certified cable, and a supported USB-C to HDMI 2.0 adapter.

Single-Stream (SST) displays

Most single-stream 4K displays are supported at 30Hz operation.

With OS X Yosemite v10.10.3 and later, most single-stream 4K (3840×2160) displays are supported at 60Hz operation on the following Mac computers:

  • MacBook Pro (Retina, 13-inch, Early 2015) and later
  • MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Mid 2014) and later
  • Mac Pro (Late 2013)
  • iMac (27-inch, Late 2013) and later
  • MacBook Air (Early 2015)

With OS X Yosemite v10.10.3 and later, most single-stream 4K (4096×2160) displays are supported at 60Hz operation on the following Mac computers:

  • MacBook Pro (15-inch, Late 2016)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, Late 2016, Four Thunderbolt 3 Ports)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, Late 2016, Two Thunderbolt 3 Ports)
  • Mac Pro (Late 2013)
  • iMac (Retina 5K, 27-inch, Late 2014) and later

With macOS Sierra, MacBook (Retina, 12-inch, Early 2015) and later supports 4K (3840×2160) displays at 60Hz operation over DisplayPort.

Multi-Stream Transport (MST) Displays

These Mac computers support multi-stream transport (MST) displays at 60 Hz:

  • MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Late 2013) and later
  • MacBook Pro (Retina, 13-inch, Early 2015) and later
  • Mac Pro (Late 2013)
  • iMac (Retina 5K, 27-inch, Late 2014) and later

If you use a 60Hz MST display with the MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Mid 2015) with AMD Radeon R9 M370X graphics card or iMac (Retina 5K, 27-inch, Late 2014), only one additional Thunderbolt display can be supported. Learn more about Thunderbolt ports and displays.

You need to manually configure 4K displays to use MST. Follow the steps below to use the display’s built-in controls to enable this feature.

  • Sharp PN-K321: Choose Menu > Setup > DisplayPort STREAM > MST > SET
  • ASUS PQ321Q: Choose OSD menu > Setup > DisplayPort Stream
  • Dell UP2414Q and UP3214Q: Choose Menu > Display Setting > DisplayPort 1.2 > Enable
  • Panasonic TC-L65WT600: Choose Menu > Display Port Settings > Stream Setting > Auto

If your specific DisplayPort display is not listed above, check with the display’s manufacturer for compatibility information.

Your Mac will automatically detect an MST-enabled display. However, your display might require a firmware update to support 60Hz operation. Contact your display’s manufacturer for details.

Dual-Cable Displays

Some displays with resolutions higher than 4K require two DisplayPort cables to connect the display at full resolution:

  • The Dell UP2715K 27-inch 5K display is supported by iMac (Retina 5K, 27-inch, Late 2014) and later and Mac Pro (Late 2013) running OS X Yosemite v10.10.3 and later.
  • The HP Z27q 5K display is supported by iMac (Retina 5K, 27-inch, Late 2014) and later and Mac Pro (Late 2013) running macOS Sierra.

LG UltraFine Displays

The LG UltraFine 4K Display is supported on these Mac computers with DisplayPort Alt-Mode over USB-C:

  • MacBook Pro (15-inch, Late 2016)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, Late 2016, Four Thunderbolt 3 Ports)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, Late 2016, Two Thunderbolt 3 Ports)
  • MacBook (Retina, 12-inch, Early 2015) and later

The LG UltraFine 5K Display is supported on these Mac computers with Thunderbolt 3:

  • MacBook Pro (15-inch, Late 2016)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, Late 2016, Four Thunderbolt 3 Ports)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, Late 2016, Two Thunderbolt 3 Ports)

Adjusting your display

Use System Preferences > Displays to adjust or scale the resolution on your display. This can make text and objects appear larger or give you more space on your screen.

Hover your mouse over one of the resolution options to see more detail on that option. To get a Detect Displays button to appear, press the Option key. To see all the available resolutions, hold down the Option key while clicking the Scaled button.

If you change display resolutions when mirroring to a 4K display or Ultra HD TV, some distortion can occur. Turn mirroring off and back on to correct this.

To get the best graphics performance from your 4K display, connect the display or its adapter directly to your Mac, instead of connecting through another peripheral or device.

Use multiple displays with your Mac Pro (Late 2013)

Learn how to connect multiple displays (such as monitors, TVs, and projectors) to your Mac Pro (Late 2013) using Thunderbolt, Mini DisplayPort, and HDMI connections.

Display configurations you can use with your Mac Pro (Late 2013)

You can connect up to six of the following properly-configured displays to your Mac Pro (Late 2013).

  • Six Apple Thunderbolt Displays (27-inch), Apple LED Cinema Displays (27-inch), or third-party Mini DisplayPort displays.
  • Three 4K displays: two connected via Mini DisplayPort and one connected via HDMI.
  • One 4K Ultra HD TV or 4K display using HDMI and four Apple Thunderbolt Displays (27-inch), Apple LED Cinema Displays (27-inch), or third-party Mini DisplayPort displays.
  • Two HDMI (HD or 4K) devices: one connected via HDMI and one connected via Mini DisplayPort with an HDMI adapter.
  • Six DVI displays. This configuration requires an active DVI adapter.

See Using 4K displays and Ultra HD TVs with Mac computers for a list of 4k displays that work with your Mac Pro.

When connecting your displays, make sure you’re using a supported configuration by connecting them to the HDMI and Thunderbolt ports on your Mac Pro. Attach displays to different Thunderbolt busses when possible (see the figure below). Don’t attach more than two displays to any bus. This means that if you use the HDMI port, be sure to then only use one of the bottom two Thunderbolt ports (Bus 0).

 

When you start up your Mac Pro, one connected display initially illuminates. Any additional connected displays display an image after your Mac is finished starting up. If one or more displays don’t display an image after startup is complete, make sure your displays and any display adapters are connected properly.

If you’re using Windows on your Mac with Boot Camp, it has different specifications for connecting multiple displays.

Use more than one 4K Ultra HD TV

You can connect a 4K Ultra HD TV to the HDMI port, and a 4K Ultra HD TV to a Thunderbolt port. Use an HDMI adapter that conforms to the High Speed HDMI cable standard. Check with the manufacturer of the cable to determine if it supports this standard. Don’t use Thunderbolt Bus 0 to connect this additional device if you’ve already connected a 4K Ultra HD TV to the HDMI port.

Use display rotation and scaling with a 4K Ultra HD TV or 4K display

Scaling and display rotation are supported for 4K Ultra HD TVs or 4K displays connected to your Mac Pro using the HDMI port. Some 4k displays might not work with display rotation when the display is set to multi-stream (MST) mode. If this happens, use the display in single-stream (SST) mode instead.

Connect a DVI display

Your Mac Pro (Late 2013) supports DVI displays using Mini DisplayPort to DVI adapters. Use a single-link DVI adapter such as the Apple Mini DisplayPort to DVI adapter for DVI displays with a resolution up to 1920×1200. Use a Dual-Link DVI adapter such as the Apple Mini DisplayPort to Dual-Link DVI adapter for resolutions up to 2560×1600.

Your Mac Pro (Late 2013) supports a total of two single-link DVI displays. If you connect a third DVI display using a passive adapter or a display using HDMI, it causes one of the three displays to become inactive.

Connect more than two DVI or HDMI displays

Mac Pro supports a total of two DVI or HDMI displays when connected via the built-in HDMI port or using the Apple Mini DisplayPort to DVI adapter. To connect additional DVI displays, use an active DVI adapter like the Apple Mini DisplayPort to Dual-Link DVI adapter. You can connect up to six active adapter DVI displays. This requires a powered USB hub since Mac Pro offers four USB ports and you need six USB ports to connect the Dual-Link DVI adapters.

Learn more

Get help with video issues on external displays connected to your Mac

Try these steps if the image on an external display connected to your Mac is blank or doesn’t look the way you expect.

Before you begin

You can resolve many display issues by updating the software on your Apple devices, cables, and adapters. If you can see an image on your screen, check for software updates using the Mac App Store:

  1. Connect your external display and any Apple video cables or adapters that you use with it.
  2. From the Apple menu, choose App Store.
  3. Click the Updates button in the App Store window.
  4. Install any macOS or firmware updates that are listed.

If you’re using a display, hub, extender, or adapter not made by Apple, check with the manufacturer for any updates that might be available.

If you’re trying to connect a 4K display or Ultra HD TV with your Mac, make sure your computer meets the requirements for using these external displays.

If your software and firmware are up to date, or if you can’t see the image on your screen, try the steps below for your specific issue.

]]>
Mac Keyboard Shortcuts http://mac.101.freemac.org/mac-keyboard-shortcuts/ Sat, 07 Jan 2017 09:48:04 +0000 http://mac.101.freemac.org/?p=10820

Create keyboard shortcuts for apps

You can create your own keyboard shortcuts for menu commands in any OS X app, including the Finder. This might be useful if a global shortcut, which works the same with most apps, conflicts with a specific app shortcut. In this case, you could create a new key combination.

You can create keyboard shortcuts only for existing menu commands. You can’t create keyboard shortcuts for general purpose tasks, such as opening an app.

  1. Choose Apple menu > System Preferences, click Keyboard, then click Shortcuts.

  2. Select App Shortcuts on the left, click the Add button , click the Application pop-up menu, then choose a specific app or All Applications.

    For example, to set a shortcut for a TextEdit command, choose TextEdit. If an app isn’t in the list, choose Other, then locate the app using the Open dialog. Some apps may not allow you to set keyboard shortcuts.

    If you want to set a shortcut for a menu command that appears in many apps, choose All Applications.

  3. In the Menu Title field, type the menu command for which you want to create a shortcut, exactly as the command appears in the app, including the > character (type ->), ellipses (type three periods without spaces or press Option-;), or other punctuation.

    For example, to set a shortcut for the default ligature command in TextEdit, you would type Format->Font->Ligatures->Use Default. To set a shortcut for the Export to PDF command, you would type File->Export to PDF… in the field.

  4. Click in the Keyboard Shortcut field, press the key combination that you want to use as the keyboard shortcut, then click Add.

    For example, press the Control, Option, and Z keys at the same time. You can use a key only once in a key combination.

Use your keyboard like a mouse

You can use your keyboard to perform many of the same actions you perform using the mouse, such as navigating to or selecting menus, icons, and items in windows and dialogs. With full keyboard access, you use the Tab key and arrow keys to navigate to items on the screen, and the Space bar to select an item.

  1. Choose Apple menu > System Preferences, then click Keyboard.

  2. Click Shortcuts.

  3. Do any of the following:

    • To navigate only to text boxes and lists on the screen, select “Text boxes and lists only.”

    • To navigate to all controls on the screen, select “All controls.”

You can also use VoiceOver, the spoken interface in OS X, to navigate to, hear, and interact with every control and item on the screen.

If you create a keyboard shortcut that already exists for another command or another app, your new shortcut won’t work—you need to change your new shortcut or the other shortcut. To change a shortcut, select it, click the key combination, then press a new key combination.

To remove a shortcut that you created, select the shortcut, then click the Delete button .

To use a keyboard shortcut, hold down one or more modifier keys while pressing the last key of the shortcut. For example, to use the shortcut Command-C (copy), hold down Command, press C, then release both keys. Mac menus and keyboards often use symbols for certain keys, including the modifier keys:

  • Command ⌘
  • Shift ⇧
  • Option ⌥
  • Control ⌃
  • Caps Lock ⇪
  • Fn
If you’re using a keyboard made for Windows PCs, use the Alt key instead of Option, and the Windows logo key instead of Command. Some Mac keyboards and shortcuts use special keys in the top row, which include icons for volume, display brightness, and other functions. Press the icon key to perform that function, or combine it with the Fn key to use it as an F1, F2, F3, or other standard function key.To learn more shortcuts, check the menus of the app you’re using. Every app can have its own shortcuts, and shortcuts that work in one app may not work in another.

Cut, copy, paste, and other common shortcuts

          Shortcut Description
Command-X Cut: Remove the selected item and copy it to the Clipboard.
Command-C Copy the selected item to the Clipboard. This also works for files in the Finder.
Command-V Paste the contents of the Clipboard into the current document or app. This also works for files in the Finder.
Command-Z Undo the previous command. You can then press Command-Shift-Z to Redo, reversing the undo command. In some apps, you can undo and redo multiple commands.
Command-A Select All items.
Command-F Find: Open a Find window, or find items in a document.
Command-G Find Again: Find the next occurrence of the item previously found. To find the previous occurrence, press Command-Shift-G.
Command-H Hide the windows of the front app. To view the front app but hide all other apps, press Command-Option-H.
Command-M Minimize the front window to the Dock. To minimize all windows of the front app, press Command-Option-M.
Command-N New: Open an new document or window.
Command-O Open the selected item, or open a dialog to select a file to open.
Command-P Print the current document.
Command-S Save the current document.
Command-W Close the front window. To close all windows of the app, press Command-Option-W.
Command-Q Quit the app.
Option-Command-Esc Force Quit: Choose an app to force quit. Or press Command-Shift-Option-Esc and hold for 3 seconds to force just the front app to quit.
Command–Space bar Spotlight: Show or hide the Spotlight search field. To perform a Spotlight search from a Finder window, press Command–Option–Space bar. If you use multiple input sources to type in different languages, these shortcuts change input sources instead of showing Spotlight.
Space bar Quick Look: Use Quick Look to preview the selected item.
Command-Tab Switch apps: Switch to the next most recently used app among your open apps.
Shift-Command-Tilde (~) Switch windows: Switch to the next most recently used window of the front app.
Shift-Command-3 Screenshot: Take a screenshot of the entire screen. Learn more screenshot shortcuts.
Command-Comma (,) Preferences: Open preferences for the front app.

Sleep, log out, and shut down shortcuts

               Shortcut Description
Power button Tap to turn on your Mac or wake your Mac from sleep.
Hold for 1.5 seconds while your Mac is awake to display a dialog asking if you want to restart, sleep, or shut down. If you don’t want to wait 1.5 seconds, press Control–Power button or Control–Media Eject  .
Hold for 5 seconds to force your Mac to turn off.
Control–Command–Power button Force your Mac to restart.
Control–Shift–(Power button or Media Eject ) Put your displays to sleep.
Control–Command–Media Eject  Quit all apps, then restart your Mac. If any open documents have unsaved changes, you’ll be asked whether you want to save them.
Control–Option–Command–(Power button or Media Eject ) Quit all apps, then shut down your Mac. If any open documents have unsaved changes, you’ll be asked whether you want to save them.
Shift-Command-Q Log out of your macOS user account. You’ll be asked to confirm.
Option-Shift-Command-Q Log out of your macOS user account immediately, without being asked to confirm.

Document shortcuts

               Shortcut Description
Command-B Boldface the selected text, or turn boldfacing on or off.
Command-I Italicize the selected text, or turn italics on or off.
Command-U Underline the selected text, or turn underlining on or off.
Command-T Show or hide the Fonts window.
Command-D Select the Desktop folder from within an Open dialog or Save dialog.
Control-Command-D Show or hide the definition of the selected word.
Shift-Command-Colon (:) Display the Spelling and Grammar window.
Command-Semicolon (;) Find misspelled words in the document.
Option-Delete Delete the word to the left of the insertion point.
Control-H Delete the character to the left of the insertion point. Or use Delete.
Control-D Delete the character to the right of the insertion point. Or use Fn-Delete.
Fn-Delete Forward delete on keyboards that don’t have a Forward Delete   key. Or use Control-D.
Control-K Delete the text between the insertion point and the end of the line or paragraph.
Command-Delete Select Delete or Don’t Save in a dialog that contains a Delete or Don’t Save button.
Fn–Up Arrow Page Up: Scroll up one page.
Fn–Down Arrow Page Down: Scroll down one page.
Fn–Left Arrow Home: Scroll to the beginning of a document.
Fn–Right Arrow End: Scroll to the end of a document.
Command–Up Arrow Move the insertion point to the beginning of the document.
Command–Down Arrow Move the insertion point to the end of the document.
Command–Left Arrow Move the insertion point to the beginning of the current line.
Command–Right Arrow Move the insertion point to the end of the current line.
Option–Left Arrow Move the insertion point to the beginning of the previous word.
Option–Right Arrow Move the insertion point to the end of the next word.
Shift–Command–Up Arrow Select the text between the insertion point and the beginning of the document.
Shift–Command–Down Arrow Select the text between the insertion point and the end of the document.
Shift–Command–Left Arrow Select the text between the insertion point and the beginning of the current line.
Shift–Command–Right Arrow Select the text between the insertion point and the end of the current line.
Shift–Up Arrow Extend text selection to the nearest character at the same horizontal location on the line above.
Shift–Down Arrow Extend text selection to the nearest character at the same horizontal location on the line below.
Shift–Left Arrow Extend text selection one character to the left.
Shift–Right Arrow Extend text selection one character to the right.
Option–Shift–Up Arrow Extend text selection to the beginning of the current paragraph, then to the beginning of the following paragraph if pressed again.
Option–Shift–Down Arrow Extend text selection to the end of the current paragraph, then to the end of the following paragraph if pressed again.
Option–Shift–Left Arrow Extend text selection to the beginning of the current word, then to the beginning of the following word if pressed again.
Option–Shift–Right Arrow Extend text selection to the end of the current word, then to the end of the following word if pressed again.
Control-A Move to the beginning of the line or paragraph.
Control-E Move to the end of a line or paragraph.
Control-F Move one character forward.
Control-B Move one character backward.
Control-L Center the cursor or selection in the visible area.
Control-P Move up one line.
Control-N Move down one line.
Control-O Insert a new line after the insertion point.
Control-T Swap the character behind the insertion point with the character in front of the insertion point.
Command–Left Curly Bracket ({) Left align.
Command–Right Curly Bracket (}) Right align.
Shift–Command–Vertical bar (|) Center align.
Option-Command-F Go to the search field.
Option-Command-T Show or hide a toolbar in the app.
Option-Command-C Copy Style: Copy the formatting settings of the selected item to the Clipboard.
Option-Command-V Paste Style: Apply the copied style to the selected item.
Option-Shift-Command-V Paste and Match Style: Apply the style of the surrounding content to the item pasted within that content.
Option-Command-I Show or hide the inspector window.
Shift-Command-P Page setup: Display a window for selecting document settings.
Shift-Command-S Display the Save As dialog, or duplicate the current document.
Shift–Command–
Minus sign (-)
Decrease the size of the selected item.
Shift–Command–
Plus sign (+)
Increase the size of the selected item. Command–Equal sign (=) performs the same function.
Shift–Command–
Question mark (?)
Open the Help menu.

Finder shortcuts

          Shortcut Description
Command-D Duplicate the selected files.
Command-E Eject the selected disk or volume.
Command-F Start a Spotlight search in the Finder window.
Command-I Show the Get Info window for a selected file.
Shift-Command-C Open the Computer window.
Shift-Command-D Open the desktop folder.
Shift-Command-F Open the All My Files window.
Shift-Command-G Open a Go to Folder window.
Shift-Command-H Open the Home folder of the current macOS user account.
Shift-Command-I Open iCloud Drive.
Shift-Command-K Open the Network window.
Option-Command-L Open the Downloads folder.
Shift-Command-O Open the Documents folder.
Shift-Command-R Open the AirDrop window.
Shift-Command-T Add selected Finder item to the Dock (OS X Mountain Lion or earlier)
Control-Shift-Command-T Add selected Finder item to the Dock (OS X Mavericks or later)
Shift-Command-U Open the Utilities folder.
Option-Command-D Show or hide the Dock. This often works even when you’re not in the Finder.
Control-Command-T Add the selected item to the sidebar (OS X Mavericks or later).
Option-Command-P Hide or show the path bar in Finder windows.
Option-Command-S Hide or show the Sidebar in Finder windows.
Command–Slash (/) Hide or show the status bar in Finder windows.
Command-J Show View Options.
Command-K Open the Connect to Server window.
Command-L Make an alias of the selected item.
Command-N Open a new Finder window.
Shift-Command-N Create a new folder.
Option-Command-N Create a new Smart Folder.
Command-R Show the original file for the selected alias.
Command-T Show or hide the tab bar when a single tab is open in the current Finder window.
Shift-Command-T Show or hide a Finder tab.
Option-Command-T Show or hide the toolbar when a single tab is open in the current Finder window.
Option-Command-V Move: Move the files in the Clipboard from their original location to the current location.
Option-Command-Y View a Quick Look slideshow of the selected files.
Command-Y Use Quick Look to preview the selected files.
Command-1 View the items in the Finder window as icons.
Command-2 View the items in a Finder window as a list.
Command-3 View the items in a Finder window in columns.
Command-4 View the items in a Finder window with Cover Flow.
Command–Left Bracket ([) Go to the previous folder.
Command–Right Bracket (]) Go to the next folder.
Command–Up Arrow Open the folder that contains the current folder.
Command–Control–Up Arrow Open the folder that contains the current folder in a new window.
Command–Down Arrow Open the selected item.
Command–Mission Control Show the desktop. This works even when you’re not in the Finder.
Command–Brightness Up Turn Target Display Mode on or off.
Command–Brightness Down Turn display mirroring on or off when your Mac is connected to more than one display.
Right Arrow Open the selected folder. This works only when in list view.
Left Arrow Close the selected folder. This works only when in list view.
Option–double-click Open a folder in a separate window and close the current window.
Command–double-click Open a folder in a separate tab or window.
Command-Delete Move the selected item to the Trash.
Shift-Command-Delete Empty the Trash.
Option-Shift-Command-Delete Empty the Trash without confirmation dialog.
Command-Y Use Quick Look to preview the files.
Option–Brightness Up Open Displays preferences. This works with either Brightness key.
Option–Mission Control Open Mission Control preferences.
Option–Volume Up Open Sound preferences. This works with any of the volume keys.
Command key while dragging Move the dragged item to another volume or location. The pointer changes while you drag the item.
Option key while dragging Copy the dragged item. The pointer changes while you drag the item.
Option-Command while dragging Make an alias of the dragged item. The pointer changes while you drag the item.
Option-click a disclosure triangle Open all folders within the selected folder. This works only when in list view.
Command-click a window title See the folders that contain the current folder.

Other shortcuts

Learn more

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Starting up your Mac http://mac.101.freemac.org/starting-up-your-mac/ Sat, 07 Jan 2017 09:33:54 +0000 http://mac.101.freemac.org/?p=10814 You might see slight differences in startup screens or sequences mentioned in this article, depending on the model of your Mac, the version of OS X and firmware your Mac has, and which startup options you’ve selected. For example:

  • The background at any stage of the startup process can be blue, black, or gray.
    It can also be a desktop picture.
  • The progress indicator can be a progress bar or a spinning indicator   .
  • If you start from Windows using Boot Camp, your Mac doesn’t display an Apple logo or the other screens in this article.

Power On

When you first turn on your Mac, the screen is off (black) and you hear a startup chime. Your Mac initializes its BootROM and memory (RAM). It then performs a power-on self test (POST) and a BootROM test. If you hear additional beeps or chimes at this point, this indicates a possible hardware issue and startup halts. If you’ve added memory to your Mac, check to make sure it’s installed properly.

Blank screen

After the power-on self test is complete, your Mac sends a video signal to your connected displays. The display screen might appear black or gray at this point in the startup sequence and the display’s backlight should turn on. If you don’t see an image appear on your screen after a few moments, try turning up your display’s brightness. If you’re using an external display, make sure it’s connected properly and turned on.

FileVault login

If you’ve enabled full disk encryption using FileVault, you’re prompted to enter your user account name and password to unlock your startup disk.

Apple logo

When you see the Apple logo appear, it means that the computer has found the startup file “boot.efi” on your startup disk. This tells your Mac where to locate the System folder on your startup disk.

Progress indicator

After your Mac locates the System Folder on your startup disk, a progress bar or spinning wheel appears on the screen. This lets you know that your Mac is reading files from the OS X System folder.

Login Window

If your Mac doesn’t have FileVault enabled, or you turned off automatic login in System Preferences, you see a screen showing the available user accounts on this Mac. Choose your user account name and enter your password to log in.

Desktop

After your Mac is finished starting up and you’re logged in, you see your desktop picture and the Dock.

Other screens you might see

You might see one of these screens appear during startup if you’ve changed your startup options, or there’s an issue starting up your Mac.

Folder with a question mark If you see a folder with a question mark appear instead of the Apple logo, it means your Mac couldn’t find a local or network-based startup disk. This can happen if the disk selected in the Startup Disk pane of System Preferences isn’t available. Wait a few seconds to see if your Mac is able to locate the startup disk you specified.

If you still see a question mark after waiting a few moments, use Startup Manager to start up your Mac, then re-select your startup disk from System Preferences.

If a question mark appears after you install a software update, re-select your startup disk using OS X Recovery.

Prohibitory symbol

When you see a circle with a slash symbol instead of the Apple logo, it means your Mac couldn’t find a valid System Folder to start up from.

If you’re using your Mac at a school or business, it might be trying to start from the wrong version of OS X. Contact your IT department for more help.

If this is your personal Mac, try reinstalling OS X by using OS X Recovery.

Lock icon

If you set a firmware password on your Mac, you might see a lock icon at startup if you try to start your Mac from another volume like an external drive or OS X Recovery. Enter your firmware password to continue starting up.

Spinning globe If you see a spinning globe instead of an Apple logo, it means your Mac is starting from a network-based startup disk like Netboot or Internet Recovery instead of a connected or built-in startup disk. If you didn’t mean for your Mac to start this way, press and hold the power key to turn off your Mac. Then, press the power key again to start up normally.

If your Mac always starts to a spinning globe and you’re at a school or business, check with your IT department for more information. There may be a server on your network that your Mac is trying to start from. If this is your personal Mac, try starting from OS X Recovery to check your startup disk and OS X.

Battery icon

If you see a battery icon appear on the screen instead of an Apple logo, it means the battery in your notebook Mac is too low to start up. Connect the power adapter to charge your Mac’s battery, then try starting up again.

PIN code

If you lock your Mac using Find My Mac, your screen shows a four or six digit lock screen at startup. Your Mac doesn’t continue starting up until you enter the code that you set.

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iMac Tips http://mac.101.freemac.org/imac-tips/ Fri, 06 Jan 2017 15:51:08 +0000 http://osx.tips.onemac.net/?p=10865

Your iMac is packed with advanced technologies and a beautiful reflection-reducing display in a remarkably thin design.

Part of the back of an iMac, showing the 3.5 mm headphone jack, SDXC slot, USB 3 ports, Thunderbolt 2 ports, and Gigabit Ethernet port.
  • 3.5 mm headphone jack: Plug in stereo headphones or a digital 5.1 surround-sound speaker system and experience high-quality sound while watching movies or listening to your favorite music.
  • SDXC card slot: Transfer photos, videos, and data to and from your iMac, with the latest high-capacity SD cards.
  • USB 3 ports: Connect an iPad, iPhone, iPod, digital camera, camcorder, external storage, or printer quickly and easily. The iMac USB 3 ports support USB 3 and USB 2 devices.
  • Thunderbolt 2 ports: Connect high-speed peripherals such as RAID arrays, external displays, and docking stations. Thunderbolt 2 supports adapters (sold separately) for technologies like FireWire or HDMI, for increased connectivity.
  • Gigabit Ethernet port: Connect a router or modem to get on the Internet, or connect to another computer to transfer files without using Wi-Fi.
Back view of iMac showing the AC power cord and the power button.
  • AC power cord: Pass the power cord through the hole in the stand, plug it into the power port on the back of your iMac, then plug the cord into a power outlet.
  • Power button: Press and hold for three seconds to turn your iMac on or off, or press to put it to sleep.
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MacBook Air Tips http://mac.101.freemac.org/macbook-air-tips/ Fri, 06 Jan 2017 10:35:59 +0000 http://osx.tips.onemac.net/?p=10857

Take a tour

The 13-inch MacBook Air has the following features built in:

The left side view of a MacBook Air with callouts to the MagSafe 2 port, the USB 3 port, the 3.5 mm headphone jack, and the dual microphones.
  • MagSafe 2 power port: Charge your computer. If you accidentally trip over the power cord, it cleanly detaches.
  • USB 3 ports: Transfer data, connect USB 2 and USB 3 devices, and more.
  • 3.5 mm headphone jack: Plug in stereo headphones or a digital 5.1 surround-sound speaker system and experience high-quality sound while watching movies or listening to your favorite music.
  • Dual microphones: Talk with friends or record audio.
The right side of a MacBook Air, showing the SDXC card slot, another USB 3 port, and the Thunderbolt 2 port.
  • SDXC card slot: Transfer photos and videos from your digital camera.
  • Thunderbolt 2 port: Transfer data at lightning-fast speeds, and connect a display such as the Apple Thunderbolt Display.
Looking down on an open MacBook Air, with callouts to the FaceTime HD camera, the power button, and the Multi-Touch trackpad.
  • FaceTime HD camera: Make FaceTime video calls or take pictures and video. If the light is glowing, the camera is on. For more information, see FaceTime.
  • Power button: Press and hold for three seconds to turn your MacBook Air on or off, or press to put it to sleep.
  • Multi-Touch trackpad: Use the Multi-Touch trackpad for precise pointer control. It supports inertial scrolling, pinch, rotate, swipe, three-finger swipe, four-finger swipe, tap, double-tap, and drag capabilities. For more about using gestures, see Trackpad.

Set up

The first time you turn on your MacBook Air, Setup Assistant walks you through the simple steps needed to start using your new Mac. If you want to transfer your data from another computer, see Migrate your data for details.

A screen with Setup Assistant open to the Welcome screen.

Be sure to connect to Wi-Fi, turn on Bluetooth® wireless technology, get an Apple ID, then sign in to iCloud. You can also activate Siri if you want. You can do these steps quickly and easily with Setup Assistant—but if you want to do them later, here’s how:

Connect to Wi-Fi. Click the Wi-Fi status icon in the menu bar, then choose a Wi-Fi network and enter the password, if necessary.

Turn Wi-Fi on or off. Click the Wi-Fi status icon in the menu bar, then choose Turn Wi-Fi On or Turn Wi-Fi Off.

Turn Bluetooth on or off. Click the Bluetooth icon in the menu bar, then choose Turn Bluetooth On or Turn Bluetooth Off.

Tip: If you don’t see the Wi-Fi status icon or Bluetooth icon in the menu bar, you can add them. For Wi-Fi, choose Apple menu > System Preferences, then click Network. Click Wi-Fi in the list on the left, then select “Show Wi-Fi status in menu bar.” For Bluetooth, choose Apple menu > System Preferences, click Bluetooth, then select “Show Bluetooth in menu bar.”

Get an Apple ID. Your Apple ID is the account you use for everything you do with Apple—including using the App Store, the iTunes Store, iCloud, iMessage, and more. Your Apple ID consists of an email address and a password. You need only one Apple ID to use any Apple service, on any device—whether it’s your computer, iOS device, or Apple Watch. It’s best to have your own Apple ID and not share it—create separate Apple IDs for each family member.

If you don’t already have an Apple ID, you can create one (it’s free). Go to the Apple ID account website.

Important: If you forget your Apple ID password, you don’t need to create a new Apple ID. Just click the Forgot link in the login window to retrieve your password.

Set up iCloud on your MacBook Air. With iCloud, you can store all of your content—documents, movies, music, photos, and more—in the cloud, and access it anywhere you go.

To set up iCloud, choose Apple menu > System Preferences, then click iCloud. In the window that appears, enter your Apple ID and password. Then select the features you want to use. To find out more, see Access your content anywhere with iCloud.

Important: Be sure to use the same Apple ID for iCloud on all your devices.

For information about setting up and using Siri on your MacBook Air, see Siri.

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MacBook Pro Tips http://mac.101.freemac.org/macbook-pro/ Wed, 04 Jan 2017 10:55:35 +0000 http://osx.tips.onemac.net/?p=10848

Set up

The first time your MacBook Pro starts up, Setup Assistant walks you through the simple steps needed to begin using your new Mac. If you want to transfer your data from another computer, see Migrate your data for details.

A screen with Setup Assistant open to the Welcome screen.

Be sure to connect to Wi-Fi, turn on Bluetooth® wireless technology, get an Apple ID, then sign in to iCloud. Activate Siri during setup, if you want. If your MacBook Pro has the Touch Bar, you can also set up Touch ID and Apple Pay.

You can do these steps quickly and easily with Setup Assistant—but if you want to do them later, here’s how:

Connect to Wi-Fi. Click the Wi-Fi status icon in the menu bar, then choose a Wi-Fi network and enter the password, if necessary.

Turn Wi-Fi on or off. Click the Wi-Fi status icon in the menu bar, then choose Turn Wi-Fi On or Turn Wi-Fi Off.

Turn Bluetooth on or off. Click the Bluetooth icon in the menu bar, then choose Turn Bluetooth On or Turn Bluetooth Off.

Tip: If you don’t see the Wi-Fi status icon or Bluetooth icon in the menu bar, you can add them. For Wi-Fi, choose Apple menu > System Preferences, then click Network. Click Wi-Fi in the list on the left, then select “Show Wi-Fi status in menu bar.” For Bluetooth, choose Apple menu > System Preferences, click Bluetooth, then select “Show Bluetooth in menu bar.”

Get an Apple ID. Your Apple ID is the account you use for everything you do with Apple—including using the App Store, the iTunes Store, iCloud, iMessage, and more. Your Apple ID consists of an email address and a password. You need only one Apple ID to use any Apple service, on any device—whether it’s your computer, iOS device, or Apple Watch. It’s best to have your own Apple ID and not share it—create separate Apple IDs for each family member.

If you don’t already have an Apple ID, you can create one (it’s free). Go to the Apple ID account website.

Important: If you forget your Apple ID password, you don’t need to create a new Apple ID. Just click the Forgot link in the login window to retrieve your password.

Set up iCloud on your MacBook Pro. With iCloud, you can store all of your content—documents, movies, music, photos, and more—in the cloud, and access it anywhere you go.

To set up iCloud, choose Apple menu > System Preferences, then click iCloud. In the window that appears, enter your Apple ID and password. Then select the features you want to use. For more about iCloud, see Access your content anywhere with iCloud.

Important: Be sure to use the same Apple ID for iCloud on all your devices.

Set up Siri. You can enable Siri on your MacBook Pro when prompted during setup. To learn how to turn on Siri later and for information about using Siri on your Mac, see Siri.

Set up Touch ID. If your MacBook Pro has the Touch Bar and Touch ID, you can add a fingerprint to Touch ID during setup. To set up Touch ID later or to add additional fingerprints, click the System Preferences icon  in the Dock, or choose Apple menu > System Preferences. Then click Touch ID. To add a fingerprint, click the add icon and follow the onscreen instructions. You can add up to three fingerprints per user account (you can add up to five fingerprints total to your MacBook Pro).

The Touch ID preferences window with options for adding a fingerprint and using Touch ID to unlock your Mac, use Apple Pay, and buy from the iTunes, App Store, and iBooks Store.

You can also set options for how you want to use Touch ID on your MacBook Pro: to unlock your Mac instead of entering your password, to use Apple Pay (see Apple Pay), or to purchase items on the iTunes Store, App Store, and iBooks Store.

Tip: If two or more users use the same MacBook Pro, each one can add a fingerprint to Touch ID to quickly unlock, authenticate, and log in to the MacBook Pro. Your MacBook Pro can store a total of five fingerprints.

For more information about Touch ID, see the Apple Support article Use Touch ID on your MacBook Pro.

Set up Apple Pay. If you have a MacBook Pro with the Touch Bar, you can set up Apple Pay for one user account on your MacBook Pro during setup. Other users can still pay with Apple Pay, but they must complete the purchase using their iPhone or Apple Watch that’s been set up for Apple Pay (see Apple Pay for more details). Follow the onscreen prompts to add and verify your card. If you already use a card for iTunes purchases, you might be prompted to verify this card first.

To set up Apple Pay or add additional cards later, click the System Preferences icon  in the Dock, or choose Apple menu > System Preferences. Then click Wallet & Apple Pay and follow the onscreen prompts to set up Apple Pay.

Note: The card issuer determines whether your card is eligible to use with Apple Pay, and may ask you to provide additional information to complete the verification process. Many credit and debit cards can be used with Apple Pay. For information about Apple Pay availability and current credit card issuers, see the Apple Support article Apple Pay Participating Banks.

The desktop

The first thing you see on your MacBook Pro is the desktop, where you can quickly open apps, search for anything on your MacBook Pro and the web, organize your files, and more.

A MacBook Pro screen calling out the Apple menu, desktop, Help menu, Finder window, menu bar, Wi-Fi status icon, Ask Siri icon, Finder icon, System Preferences icon, and the Dock.

Tip: Can’t find the pointer? To magnify it temporarily, move your finger rapidly back and forth on the trackpad. Or if you’re using a mouse, slide it back and forth quickly.

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Touch Bar Tips http://mac.101.freemac.org/touch-bar-tips/ Wed, 04 Jan 2017 10:15:19 +0000 http://osx.tips.onemac.net/?p=10842

The Touch Bar on MacBook Pro (15-inch, Late 2016) and MacBook Pro (13-inch, Late 2016, Four Thunderbolt 3 Ports) replaces the function keys at the top of your keyboard and gives you quick access to commands on your Mac. It changes automatically based on what you’re doing and apps that you’re using.

If you need access to function keys (F1–F12), hold down the Function (fn) key at the bottom-left of your keyboard. Touch Bar changes to show the function keys for you to select, and then it returns to its previous state when you release the Function key.

For some apps, you can make the function keys display permanently in Touch Bar:

  1. In System Preferences, choose Keyboard.
  2. Click Shortcuts.
  3. From the left sidebar, select Function Keys.
  4. Click the “+” symbol, then navigate to the app and select it.

Now when you open or switch to this app, Touch Bar always displays the function keys.

     

You can also use an on-screen keyboard to access function keys:

  1. From System Preferences, select Keyboard.
  2. Check “Show Keyboard, Emoji and symbol viewers in menu bar”.
  3. Choose the viewer icon  in the menu bar, then choose Show Keyboard Viewer.

An on-screen keyboard appears with function keys that you can click.

Find system controls and settings in the Control Strip

When you start up your MacBook Pro, the Control Strip on the right side of the Touch Bar shows a few familiar buttons like volume, mute, and display brightness, as well as Siri. The Escape (Esc) button appears on the left side of the Touch Bar.

System controls: Tap  in the Control Strip and it expands, showing system controls like brightness, Exposé, Launchpad, and media playback:

Make your adjustments, then tap . The Control Strip returns to its smaller version on the right side of the Touch Bar, with Esc showing on the left side. You can always tap  to expand the Control Strip and see all the system controls.

Function buttons: To use the F1–F12 function buttons in the Touch Bar, hold the Function (fn) key at the bottom left of your keyboard. The function keys appear:

Learn more about using function keys on MacBook Pro with Touch Bar.

As you use your Mac, the Touch Bar changes automatically based on what you’re doing to show relevant tools that you already know how to use. Read on for examples of what the Touch Bar can do in your favorite apps, and learn how to customize the Touch Bar to make it your own.

Use Touch Bar controls in apps

Many of the built-in apps on your Mac have Touch Bar controls that make common actions even easier. And your favorite third-party apps can take advantage of Touch Bar as well.

Here’s a look at what Touch Bar can do in some popular Mac apps. Explore your other favorite apps to see what Touch Bar offers.

Finder

Navigate and view: In Finder, tap the arrows in the Touch Bar to move back and forth among items, and tap  to view items in Quick Look.

View and sort: Tap  to see options for viewing and sorting your files and folders.

Share: Tap  to see options for sharing your files.

Tag: Tap  to see tags you can apply to items.

Safari

Visit your favorites: In Safari, tap a favorite website in Touch Bar to open it.

Navigate and search: Click the right or left arrow button to go backward or forward. Tap the search field to begin a search, or tap  to open a new tab.

Mail

Perform common tasks: You can use the Touch Bar in Mail for composing, replying, archiving, marking as junk, and flagging messages.

Use predictive input: In Mail and other apps where you compose text, the Touch Bar predicts as you type. Tap a word or emoji to insert it.

Format your text: As you type a message, select some text and the Touch Bar shows you formatting options like bold, italic, and lists.

Say it with emoji: In apps like Mail and Messages, you can choose emoji instead of words for a fun way to make your point. Tap  to see the emoji you use most, and then tap an emoji to insert it.

Photos

Speed through your library: In Photos, the Touch Bar speeds your search for just the right photo as you slide your finger across the thumbnails. You can tap  to mark a selected photo as a favorite or tap  rotate it.

Edit your photos: After you select a photo, tap  to see editing options (crop, filters, adjust, retouch, and red-eye). You can edit your photo using controls that appear on the Touch Bar.

Maps

Find yourself: In Maps, tap  in the Touch Bar to find your location. Tap the search field to type where you want to go.

See what’s nearby: The Touch Bar shows buttons with categories of nearby locations, like restaurants, hotels, and gas stations.

Get there: When you select a location to visit, you see options for getting directions, calling the business, or viewing its website.

Notes

Take a note: In Notes, tap  in the Touch Bar to create a new note. Tap  to add a checklist item.

Format your text: Tap  to show buttons for aligning text and applying bold, italic, or underscore styles.

Apply styles: Tap  to apply paragraph styles like numbered lists, bulleted lists, or headings.

Calendar

See your day: In Calendar, tap the Today button to see today’s events, or slide across the Touch Bar to select the month—past or future.

Edit your events: Select an event in your calendar, then tap to get the event details, edit the time or place, and add or delete invitees.

FaceTime

Control your calls: In FaceTime, you can make and answer calls, get caller info, and send a message or email when you can’t talk—all from the Touch Bar.

Customize your Touch Bar

In many apps, like Finder, Mail, and Safari, you can customize the Touch Bar.

Choose View > Customize Touch Bar. The customization window appears on your display, allowing you to choose your favorite items:

When you’re customizing the Touch Bar, its buttons jiggle, and you see the Done button on the left side.

Use your cursor to drag items that you want down into the Touch Bar. You can also drag items left and right within the Touch Bar to rearrange them, or drag them up and out of the Touch Bar to remove them.

Tap Done in the Touch Bar or click Done on the screen when you finish.

To customize the Control Strip, select View > Customize Touch Bar in any app that supports customization, then touch the Control Strip region of the Touch Bar to switch to Control Strip customization. You can also customize the Control Strip in the Keyboard section of System Preferences.

Explore and experiment

Most apps include shortcuts, tools, and controls in the Touch Bar for the tasks that you want to do. Tap around to see what you can accomplish quickly and easily.

It’s often easier to tap the Touch Bar than to click or select items onscreen. For example, open Calculator and do quick calculations with the number keys and the functions on the Touch Bar—without moving your cursor, clicking, and typing.

Keep using the Touch Bar to find the best ways to do what you want, and explore your favorite third-party apps as they add a new dimension with Touch Bar features.

Use accessibility options with Touch Bar

The accessibility features that help you use your Mac can also help you use the Touch Bar. Hold the Command key while you press Touch ID (power button) three times to toggle VoiceOver, which reads aloud Touch Bar commands.

Use VoiceOver with Touch Bar

VoiceOver tells you what’s on your screen, and walks you through actions like selecting a menu option or activating a button using your keyboard or trackpad. It can also tell you what’s on your Touch Bar.

To turn VoiceOver on or off, hold the Command key and triple-press the Touch ID button, which is on the right side of Touch Bar at the top of your keyboard:

 

After you turn on VoiceOver, you can use these gestures with Touch Bar:

  • Move one finger over the Touch Bar to change the Touch Bar focus and have VoiceOver announce the element under your finger.
  • Swipe left or right with one finger to move the Touch Bar focus to the previous or next Touch Bar element.
  • Double-tap anywhere on the Touch Bar to activate the element under the Touch Bar focus.
  • Split-tap (touch an item with one finger, then tap the Touch Bar with another) to activate the element under the first finger you use.
  • Double-tap and hold to enter direct touch mode for the element under the Touch Bar focus. This allows you to adjust sliders.

Use Touch Bar Zoom

If you use the Zoom feature on your Mac, you can also turn on Touch Bar Zoom.

Select Apple menu () > System Preferences. Then click on Accessibility, select Zoom, and turn on Enable Touch Bar Zoom.

Here’s what you can do after you turn on Touch Bar Zoom:

  • Touch and drag with one finger on the Touch Bar to see a zoomed view of the Touch Bar on your display.
  • Change the magnification level by holding down the Command key and use a two-finger pinch gesture.
  • While panning with one finger, quickly tap with a second finger to synthesize a tap where your first finger is. Hold the second finger down and move both fingers together to synthesize a tap down and drag where your first finger is.
  • Hold your finger still in one location to enter direct-touch mode, which allows you to interact directly with the control under your finger.

Use Switch Control with Touch Bar

You can use Switch Control to display Touch Bar on your MacBook Pro screen. This lets you access Touch Bar elements with standard pointer controls.

First, turn on Switch Control:

  1. Choose Apple menu > System Preferences, click Accessibility, then click Switch Control.
  2. Click General, then select Enable Switch Control. The Switch Control Home Panel appears on your desktop.

Next, toggle Touch Bar:

  1. In the Switch Control Home Panel, click System.
  2. Click Toggle Touch Bar to show or hide Touch Bar.

Learn more about using pointer controls.

Use Accessibility Options to turn on other features

macOS features an Accessibility Options window that lets you quickly turn on or off common accessibility features like Zoom, VoiceOver, Sticky Keys, and more. To bring up this window on your MacBook Pro, triple-press the Touch ID button.

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Dock Tips http://mac.101.freemac.org/dock-tips/ Wed, 04 Jan 2017 10:09:00 +0000 http://osx.tips.onemac.net/?p=10840 The Dock is the bar of icons that sits at the bottom or side of your screen. It provides easy access to many of the apps that come with your Mac (like MailSafari, and Messages). You can add your own apps, documents and folders to the Dock, too.

image of the Dock

To use an item in the Dock, click its icon. If you want to listen to some music, click the iTunes icon (the icon with music notes) to open iTunes. To check your email, click the Mail icon (it looks like a stamp).

When an application is open, the Dock displays an illuminated dash beneath the application’s icon. To make any currently running application the active one, click its icon in the Dock.

Organizing the Dock

The Dock keeps apps on its left side. Folders, documents, and minimized windows are kept on the right side of the Dock. If you look closely, you can see a vertical separator line that separates these two sides.

the trash icon in the dock

If you want to rearrange where an icon appears on the Dock, just drag it to another location in the Dock. The Trash and the Finder are special items, so they are always present at each end of the Dock.

Adding and removing Dock items

If you want to add an application to the Dock, click the Launchpad icon in the Dock. Then, drag an app icon from the Launchpad to the Dock. The icons in the Dock move aside to make room for the new item. If you want to add a file or folder to the Dock, just drag its icon from any Finder window (or the desktop) and drop it on the Dock.

To remove an item from the Dock, drag its icon an inch or more off the Dock and wait a couple seconds. Then release the icon and it disappears in a poof of smoke.

dragging an icon off the Dock

Removing an item from the Dock doesn’t permanently remove it from your computer. If you want that item back in the Dock, locate the app, file, or folder in the Finder or Launchpad, and simply drag it back into the Dock.

Learn more

To learn more about the Dock, click a topic below. You can also search for the word “Dock” from the Help menu at the top of your screen.

Minimizing Windows

If you minimize a window (click the round, yellow button in the upper-left corner of any window), the window is pulled down into the Dock. It’s held there until you click its icon to bring up the window again.

 

Stacks

You can also choose how to display folders in the Dock. You can either view them as a folder icon, or as a stack.

dock stack

Stacks display a folder’s contents as a fan or grid when you click them in the Dock. Learn more about Stacks here.

 

The Trash

The Dock includes the Trash (its icon looks like a waste basket). Drag any documents you no longer want to the Trash to get rid of them.

When you move items to the Trash, you haven’t completely deleted them. You can click the Trash icon in the Dock to see what it contains. When you’re ready to permanently delete files or folders that you’ve dragged to the Trash, click and hold the Trash icon in the Dock and choose Empty Trash.

the trash icon in the dock

If you drag a disk or other mounted volume to the Trash, it changes to an eject icon to let you know that this action ejects or removes the item rather than erasing or deleting it.

eject icon in dock

 

If you don’t see the Dock

You can also set the Dock so that it isn’t visible until you need it. If you don’t see the dock, try moving your pointer to the bottom or side of your screen to see if it appears. To turn Dock hiding on or off, choose Dock > Turn Hiding On or Turn Hiding Off from the Apple () menu.

 

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Folder Basics http://mac.101.freemac.org/folder-basics/ Mon, 02 Jan 2017 14:10:25 +0000 http://osx.tips.onemac.net/?p=10824

Everything on your Mac – Documents, Pictures, Music, Apps, and more, is organized in folders. As you create documents, install apps, and do other work, you can create new folders to keep yourself organized.

See your files in the Finder

The Finder is the home base for your Mac. The Finder icon looks like a blue smiling face; click the icon in the Dock to open a Finder window.
Finder icon in Dock

You use Finder windows to organize and access almost everything on your Mac.

Example of a Finder window

See your stuff

Click items in the Finder sidebar to see your files, apps, downloads, and more. To make the sidebar even more useful, customize it.

Use folders … or don’t

If you like organizing your files in folders, you can do that. It’s easy to create new folders in your Documents folder, on the desktop, or in iCloud Drive. For more information about iCloud Drive, see Store documents with iCloud Drive.

If you’d rather avoid folders, use All My Files. All of the files on your Mac and in iCloud are there. You can also use tags to organize your files.

Choose your view

You can choose how you view the items in Finder windows. For example, you don’t have to view your items in a list—Cover Flow lets you flip through your files and folders visually.

Send it with AirDrop

You can send a file to a nearby iOS device or Mac right from the Finder. Click AirDrop in the sidebar to get started. For more information, see Use AirDrop to send files to devices near you.

You can also select a file in the Finder, then click the Share button  to share it using Mail, Messages, Twitter, Facebook, and more.

Create a folder

  1. Click the desktop if you want to create the folder on the desktop; otherwise, open a Finder window and navigate to where you want to create the folder.

  2. Choose File > New Folder, or press Shift-Command-N.

    If the New Folder command is dimmed, you can’t create a folder in the current location. For example, you can’t create a folder in the All My Files section of the Finder sidebar.

  3. Enter a name for the folder, then press Return.

Move items into folders

Do any of the following:

Put an item in a folder: Drag it to the folder.

Put several items in a folder: Select the items, then drag one of the items to the folder.

All selected items move to the folder.

Keep an item in its original location and put a copy in a folder: Hold down the Option key, then drag the item to the folder.

Keep an item in its original location and put an alias for it in a new folder: Hold down the Option and Command keys, then drag the item to the folder.

Make a copy of an item within the same folder: Select the item, then choose File > Duplicate or press Command-D.

Copy files to a different disk: Drag the files to the disk. To move files to a different disk without copying them, hold down the Command key, then drag the files to the disk.

Quickly group multiple items into a folder

You can quickly create a folder of items on the desktop or in a Finder window.

  1. Select all the items you want to group together.

  2. Control-click one of the selected items, then choose New Folder with Selection.

  3. Enter a name for the folder, then press Return.

Merge two folders with the same name

If you have two folders with identical names at two different locations, you can merge them into a single folder.

Hold down the Option key, then drag one folder to the location that contains a folder with the same name. In the dialog that appears, click Merge.

The Merge option appears only if one of the folders contains items that are not in the other folder. If the folders contain different versions of identically named files, the only options are Stop or Replace.

To organize your files automatically, use Smart Folders. Smart Folders automatically gather files by type and subject matter, and are instantly updated as you change, add, and remove files on your Mac.

Rename files, folders, and disks

You can change the name of most files, folders, and disks, including the internal hard disk (named Macintosh HD by default). If you change the name of your hard disk, it still appears with its original name on a network.

Rename one item

  1. Select the item in a Finder window or on the desktop, then press Return. Or force click the item’s name.

  2. Enter a new name.

    You can use numbers and most symbols. You can’t include a colon (:) or start the name with a period (.). Some apps may not allow you to use a slash (/) in a filename.

  3. Press Return.

Rename multiple items

  1. Select the items in a Finder window or on the desktop, then Control-click one of them.

  2. In the shortcut menu, select Rename Items.

  3. In the pop-up menu below Rename Finder Items, choose to replace text in the names, add text to the names, or change the name format.

    • Replace text: Enter the text you want to remove in the Find field, then enter the text you want to add in the “Replace with” field.

    • Add text: Enter the text you want to add in the field, then choose to add the text before or after the current name.

    • Format: Choose a name format for the files, then choose to put the index, counter, or date before or after the name. Enter a name in the Custom Format field, then enter the number you want to start with.

  4. Click Rename.

These are some items you should not rename:

  • App folders and any items that came with your system, such as the Library folder. (If you change the name of an item and experience problems, change the name back. If this doesn’t help, you may need to reinstall the software.)

  • Filename extensions—the period followed by a few letters or words that you see at the end of some filenames (for example, .jpg). If you change an extension, you may no longer be able to open the file with the app that was used to create it.

  • Your home folder—the one with your name on it.

Open folders in new Finder tabs or windows

When you open a folder in the Finder, the folder’s contents usually replace the current contents of the window. If you prefer, you can open a folder in a new tab or window.

Set folders to open in tabs or windows

  1. In the Finder, choose Finder > Preferences, then click General.

  2. Select or deselect “Open folders in tabs instead of new windows.”

Open folders in tabs or windows

Press the Command key while you double-click the folder.

The folder opens in a new tab or window, depending on your Finder preferences.

Tip:   If the Finder toolbar and sidebar are hidden, double-clicking a folder without pressing the Command key opens the folder in a new window.

To open a new Finder window without opening a specific folder, choose File > New Finder Window or press Command-N.

Work with tabs

If all of your tabs aren’t visible, scroll through them.

When two or more tabs are open, click the Add button  to open a new tab.

To close a tab, place the pointer over the tab, then click the Delete button .

Customize the Finder toolbar and sidebar

There are several ways to customize the Finder toolbar and Finder sidebar.

Before you start, open a Finder window by clicking the Finder icon at the left end of the Dock.

Finder icon in Dock

Customize the toolbar

Hide or show the toolbar: Choose View > Hide Toolbar, or View > Show Toolbar.

Hiding the toolbar also hides the sidebar, and moves the status bar from the bottom to the top of the window.

Resize the toolbar: If you see angle brackets  at the right end of the toolbar, it means the window is too small to show all of the toolbar items. Enlarge the window or click the brackets to see the rest of the items.

Change what’s in the toolbar: Choose View > Customize Toolbar. You can drag items into and out of the toolbar, add a space between items, and choose whether to show text with the icons.

Rearrange the items in the toolbar: Hold down the Command key, then drag an item to a new location.

Add a file or app: Hold down the Command key, then drag the item to the Finder toolbar until a green plus sign (+) appears.

Remove an item: Hold down the Command key, then drag the item out of the toolbar.

Customize the sidebar

Hide or show the sidebar: Choose View > Hide Sidebar or View > Show Sidebar. (If Show Sidebar is dimmed, choose View > Show Toolbar.)

Resize the sidebar: Drag the right side of the divider bar to the right or left.

Change what’s in the sidebar: Choose Finder > Preferences, click Sidebar, then select or deselect items.

Rearrange items in the sidebar: Drag an item to a new location. You can’t rearrange items in the Shared section.

Show or hide all the items in a section: Position the pointer over the section head until you see Hide or Show appear, then click the Hide or Show button. For example, to hide temporarily your Favorites, position the pointer over the Favorites heading in the sidebar and click the Hide button.

Add a file, folder, or disk: Hold down the Command key, then drag the item to the Favorites section.

If you don’t see the Favorites section, go to Finder > Preferences > Sidebar, then select at least one item in the section.

Add an app: Hold down the Command key, then drag its icon to the Favorites section.

Remove an item: Drag the item icon out of the sidebar until you see a gray remove sign (x).

The sidebar link disappears, but the original item is still on your Mac. You can’t remove items from the Shared section.

To change other Finder preferences, choose Finder > Preferences. For more information, see Finder preferences.

To set the scrolling behavior for Finder (and other) windows, choose Apple menu > System Preferences, then click General.

 

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Spotlight Tips http://mac.101.freemac.org/search-with-spotlight/ Mon, 02 Jan 2017 13:50:17 +0000 http://osx.tips.onemac.net/?p=10818 Spotlight can find apps, documents, photos, and other files on your Mac, and use Spotlight Suggestions to get news, sports, movies, stocks, weather, and more from the web using sources like Wikipedia, Bing, Maps, and iTunes. Spotlight can even get conversions, calculations, and definitions for you.

Spotlight menu showing search example and a video result you can play

Tip:   You can drag the Spotlight window anywhere on the desktop and make it bigger.

Open Spotlight and search

Open Spotlight: Click the Spotlight icon  in the upper-right corner of the menu bar, or press Command-Space bar.

If it’s your first time using Spotlight, a description is shown in the Spotlight window. Just start typing in the search field where it says Spotlight Search.

Enter a search phrase: Start typing what you want to find—results appear as you type; you don’t need to press Return.

  • You can find files on your Mac by typing what you’re looking for the same way you’d say it. Here are some examples of natural language search phrases:
    • new york photos
    • emails from emily
    • salesreportQ1
    • presentation I worked on yesterday that contains budget
  • You can find things on the web and in the iTunes Store, iBooks Store, or App Store. For example, you can get results for weather, sports, stocks, or transit information. Or search for music, movies, books, apps, nearby stores and landmarks, and more.

Open an app: Type the name of the app, such as Preview, then press Return.

Spotlight learns from your searches, so if you enter “s” and open Safari, the next time you enter “s,” Safari is the top result.

View and use search results

Open an item: Select the item in the results list on the left, then press the Return key. Or double-click the item.

Use a preview: Click items or links in the preview on the right. For example, to hear a song in your iTunes playlist, click the Play button next to the song. Or to purchase tickets for a movie playing near you, click the movie times.

Show the location of a file on your Mac: Select the file in the results list, then hold down the Command key to show the file’s location at the bottom of the preview.

Copy an item: Drag a file from the results list to the desktop or a Finder window.

See files recently used in an app: Enter the app’s name (don’t press the Return key unless you want to open the app). To open a file, double-click it in the preview.

Make a desktop shortcut to an item: Drag the item from the results list to the desktop; just click it on the desktop to open the item in the appropriate app, such as Safari.

See all results from your Mac in the Finder: Scroll to the bottom of the results list, then double-click Show all in Finder. You can narrow the results in Finder.

Get conversions, calculations, and definitions

Convert currencies: Enter an amount to see the equivalent in other common currencies. For example, enter $100, £100, or ¥100. Or enter something like “300 sek in dollars.”

Convert temperatures: Enter a temperature like 98.8F or 32C. Or enter something like “340K in F.”

Convert measurements: Enter a measurement like 25 lb, 54 yards, or 23 stone. Or enter something like “32ft to meters.”

Get a calculation: Enter a mathematical expression, such as 956*23.94.

Get a definition: Enter a word or phrase, then click the result below Definition.

You can set options to exclude specific folders, disks, or types of information (such as email or messages) from Spotlight searches. If you want Spotlight to search content only on your Mac and not include results from the web, you can turn off Spotlight Suggestions and Bing Web Searches. For more information, see Spotlight preferences.

Not all features of Spotlight Suggestions may be available in all languages or regions and some features of Spotlight Suggestions may vary by region.

Spotlight preferences

In Spotlight preferences, choose the categories that appear in Spotlight search results. If you want, you can also keep Spotlight from searching specific folders or disks.

To open Spotlight preferences, choose Apple menu > System Preferences, then click Spotlight.

Search Results pane

Choose which categories appear in Spotlight search results: Select the categories you want to include, deselect those you don’t.

By default, Spotlight results include Spotlight Suggestions, Bing Web Searches, conversions, documents, folders, music, and more.

Allow Spotlight Suggestions in Spotlight and Look Up: Show Spotlight Suggestions in results when you search in Spotlight and look up a word.

If you don’t want your Spotlight and Look Up search queries and Spotlight Suggestions usage data sent to Apple, you can turn off Spotlight Suggestions. Deselect the “Allow Spotlight Suggestions in Spotlight and Look Up” checkbox (which automatically removes Spotlight Suggestions from the list), then deselect the Bing Web Searches checkbox in the list. With the checkboxes turned off, Spotlight searches only the contents of your Mac, and Look Up searches only the dictionary on your Mac.

You can turn off Location Services for Spotlight Suggestions in Security & Privacy preferences. If you turn off Location Services on your Mac, your precise location will not be sent to Apple. For detailed instructions and information, see About Spotlight Suggestions.

Privacy pane

Keep Spotlight from searching locations: Click the Add button , then locate the folder or disk you want to exclude. You can also drag folders or disks into the list.

Remove a folder or disk from the exclusion list: Select the folder or disk, then click the Remove button .

If you add a Time Machine backup disk to the privacy list, you will continue to see messages that Spotlight is indexing your backup disk. This indexing is necessary for Time Machine to function properly and can’t be disabled. Spotlight does exclude from searches any items you store on your backup disk that are not part of a Time Machine backup.

Important:   If you add certain files and folders to the privacy list you may not be notified when updates become available for some apps. If you add your entire internal disk to the privacy list, you won’t be notified about any updates.

Set Spotlight shortcuts

  1. Choose Apple menu > System Preferences, click Keyboard, then click Shortcuts.
  2. Select Spotlight on the left, then change the shortcuts.

    For more information about changing keyboard shortcuts, see Use global keyboard shortcuts.

Spotlight Suggestions

In addition to searching your Mac, Spotlight Suggestions shows suggestions from the Internet, iTunes, App Store, movie showtimes, locations nearby, and more in Spotlight and Look Up. To search, click the Spotlight icon  in the menu bar, then start typing in the field at the top of the Spotlight window, to the right of the Spotlight icon.

When you use Spotlight or Look Up, your search queries, the Spotlight Suggestions you select, and related usage data will be sent to Apple. Search results found on your Mac will not be sent. If you have Location Services on your Mac turned on, when you make a search query to Spotlight or use Look Up the location of your Mac at that time will be sent to Apple. Searches for common words and phrases will be forwarded from Apple to Microsoft’s Bing search engine. These searches are not stored by Microsoft. To provide you with more relevant music and video suggestions, if your Mac can access music or video subscription services, then information such as the names of the subscription services and types of subscriptions may be sent to Apple. Your account name, number and password will not be sent to Apple. Location, search queries, and usage information sent to Apple will only be used by Apple to make Spotlight Suggestions more relevant and to improve other Apple products and services.

If you do not want your Spotlight and Look Up search queries and Spotlight Suggestions usage data sent to Apple, you can turn off Spotlight Suggestions. Simply deselect the checkbox for “Allow Spotlight Suggestions in Spotlight and Look Up” and the checkbox for Bing Web Searches in the Search Results tab in the Spotlight preference pane found within System Preferences on your Mac. If you turn off Spotlight Suggestions and Bing Web Searches, Spotlight will only search the contents of your Mac and Look Up will only search the dictionary on your Mac.

You can turn off Location Services for Spotlight Suggestions in the Security & Privacy pane of System Preferences on your Mac by clicking on the Privacy tab, selecting Location Services, selecting Details next to System Services, then deselecting Safari & Spotlight Suggestions. If you turn off Location Services on your Mac, your precise location will not be sent to Apple. To deliver relevant search suggestions, Apple may use the IP address of your Internet connection to approximate your location by matching it to a geographic region.

By using these features, you agree and consent to Apple’s and its subsidiaries’ and agents’ transmission, collection, maintenance, processing, and use of this information as described above.

Information collected by Apple will be treated in accordance with Apple’s Privacy Policy, which can be found at www.apple.com/privacy.

Note:   Not all features of Spotlight Suggestions may be available in all languages or regions and some features of Spotlight Suggestions may vary by region.

 

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Window Basics http://mac.101.freemac.org/window-basics-2/ Mon, 02 Jan 2017 13:43:28 +0000 http://osx.tips.onemac.net/?p=10816

Most of the information on your Mac is displayed in windows, including Finder windows and app windows.

When you have multiple windows open, only one is active. When an app window is active, the menu bar contains the app’s name. Some windows that you open within apps, such as the Fonts window, always appear in front of other windows.

Example of a desktop with multiple windows open

Move, resize, and minimize windows

Move a window: Click the window’s title bar, then drag it where you want it.

Manually resize a window: Drag the window’s edges (top, bottom, and sides).

Maximize a window: Hold down the Option key while you click the green maximize button  in the top-left corner of an app window. To return to the previous window size, Option-click the button again.

You can also double-click an app’s title bar to maximize the window (as long as the option to do so is set to “zoom” in Dock preferences).

Minimize a window: Click the yellow minimize button  in the top-left corner of the window, or press Command-M.

You can set an option in Dock preferences to have a window minimize when you double-click its title bar.

Some windows can’t be moved or resized, and may require that you perform an action or answer a question before you can continue with a task.

Quickly switch between apps

If multiple apps are open, it may be difficult to find the one you want. Here are shortcuts you can use to move among apps.

Quickly switch to the previous app: Press Command-Tab.

Scroll through all open apps: Press Command-Tab, continue to hold the Command key, then press the Tab key repeatedly. When you get to the app you want, stop and release the keys.

You can also press Command-Tab, continue to hold down the Command key and use the mouse pointer or arrow keys to scroll.

Resume work without switching apps: Press Esc (Escape) or the period key.

Here are other tasks you can do after pressing Command-Tab and holding down the Command key:

  • Hide a selected app: Press H.

  • Quit a selected app: Press Q.

Close windows

Click the red close button  in the top-left corner of the window, or press Command-W.

When you click the close button in many apps, such as Photos or Notes, you quit the app. Other apps, such as Safari or Mail, remain open when you click the close button (only the window closes). To quit these apps, click the app’s name in the menu bar, then choose Quit [App]. For more information, see Quit apps.

With many apps, such as Calendar and Mail, you can work with the app in full screen—the app expands to fill the entire screen—or you can open a second app and use both apps side by side in Split View. For more information, see Focus on apps in full screen or Split View.

 

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Tips for Windows switchers http://mac.101.freemac.org/tips-for-windows-switchers/ Mon, 02 Jan 2017 13:26:04 +0000 http://osx.tips.onemac.net/?p=10811

Right click

Click the right corner of your Apple mouse, or click with two fingers on your Apple trackpad. You can change this in Mouse and Trackpad preferences.

Scroll, swipe, click

Settings for scroll direction, swipe gestures, and button assignments are also in Mouse and Trackpad preferences.

Close & resize windows

Buttons for closing, minimizing, and maximizing a window are in the upper-left corner of the window.

Change volume

Use the volume control   in the menu bar, or use the volume keys on your Apple keyboard.

Find files

Use Spotlight to quickly find and open apps, documents, and other files.

Open apps

You can also use Launchpad and the Dock to open your apps (programs).

Browse for files

Looking for Windows File Explorer? Learn about the Finder.

Throw files away

Looking for the Recycle Bin? Use the Trash, which is in the Dock.

Rename files

Click the file once to select it, then press the Return key and type a new name. Press Return when done.

Preview files

Preview most files on your Mac using Quick Look. Click the file once to select it, then press Space bar.

Back up files

Time Machine keeps a copy of all your files, and it remembers how your system looked on any given day.

Change Mac settings

Looking for the Control Panel? Use System Preferences instead.

Keyboard Shortcuts

Many Mac keyboard combinations use the Command (⌘) key. Learn more keys and keyboard shortcuts.

Cut

Command-X

Copy

Command-C

Paste

Command-V

Undo

Command-Z

Print

Command-P

Close window

Command-W

Switch apps

Command-Tab

Quit app

Command-Q

Forward delete

Fn-Delete or   Forward Delete icon

Find files

Command–Space bar

Force quit app

Command-Option-Esc

Take screenshot

Command-Shift-3

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App Store Tips http://mac.101.freemac.org/app-store-tips/ Mon, 02 Jan 2017 02:21:51 +0000 http://app.center.freemac.org/?p=10101

App Store overview

Shopping for apps is easy and fun in the App Store. You can choose from thousands of apps developed just for your Mac—browse, read about apps, buy the ones you want, write reviews, and even keep macOS and your apps up to date. All you need is an Apple ID. If you don’t have an Apple ID, it’s easy to create one.

Explore

Browse for apps in the Featured, Top Charts, or Categories area of the App Store. Or use the search field in the top-right corner to find specific apps. To learn about an app before downloading or buying it, click it to see a description, customer reviews, and ratings. Learn More.

The App Store window showing toolbar buttons for browsing apps

Get apps

When you find the perfect app, sign in with your Apple ID. If you don’t have an account, choose Store > Create Account to create one for yourself—including your Apple ID, nickname for posting reviews, address, and so on. This information lets you purchase apps, install and update your apps on all your computers, and reinstall apps you’ve deleted. Learn more.

The App Store sign-in dialog

Tell your friends

Let others know what you think about an app—you can rate it, write a review, and share your review using email, Twitter, Facebook, and so on. Learn more.

The App Store window for entering an app rating and a review

Always have the latest

When macOS or app updates are available, you receive a notification. A badge showing the number of available updates appears in the App Store toolbar and on the App Store icon in the Dock. To see what’s new, open App Store, then click the Updates button in the toolbar. Learn more.

App Store toolbar showing the Updates button

Sign in to the App Store

Before you can purchase or update an app from the App Store, you must sign in using an Apple ID, or create an Apple ID if you don’t have one.

An Apple ID gives you access to the iTunes Store, App Store, iBooks Store, Apple Online Store, iCloud, FaceTime, and other Apple services. It consists of an email address (for example, emilyparker@icloud.com) and a password. For more information about Apple ID, or to create a new one, go to the Apple ID account website.

Note: All of your purchases are tied to your Apple ID account, and can’t be transferred to another Apple ID account. If you bought apps on your iPad, iPhone, or other Mac, sign in using the same Apple ID to see all of your apps on this Mac. If an update to an app you purchased in the App Store is available, sign in using your Apple ID to download the update.

Sign in with your Apple ID: Choose Store > Sign In, then enter your Apple ID information.

Create an Apple ID: Choose Store > Create Account. You can also choose Store > Sign In, then click Create Apple ID.

View account settings: Sign in, then choose Store > View My Account. Account settings include your Apple ID, billing information, and the nickname you use when you review apps. You can also view purchases that you’vehidden.

Sign out: Choose Store > Sign Out.

Find, buy, and download apps

To find the perfect app, search for it or browse the App Store. Once you find the app you want, you can purchase it using your Apple ID, or you can redeem a download code or a gift card.

Search for an app: Enter one or more words in the search field at the top-right corner of the App Store window, then press Enter.

Ask Siri. Say something like: “Find apps by Apple.”  Learn more about Siri.

Browse the App Store: Browse any of the following areas:

  • Featured: Click Featured to view recommended and featured apps.
  • Top Charts: Click Top Charts to view the bestselling or most downloaded apps in a variety of categories.
  • Categories: Do either of the following:
    • Click Categories, then click a category.
    • Click Featured or Top Charts, then choose a category from the pop-up menu or the list in the Quick Links area on the right.

Learn about an app: In the App Store, click an app’s name or icon to view its description page, where you can read a description of the app, and customer reviews.

Get an app: Click the button that shows the price of the app, then click the button again to install or buy the app (or use Touch ID).

App information bubble showing the app price

During installation, you can pause or cancel.

Redeem download codes or gift cards: Click Redeem in the Quick Links area on the right (if you don’t see it, click Featured, Top Charts, or Categories in the toolbar). Enter the download code or the code from your gift card.

If you have a gift card with a box around the code, you can use the built-in camera on your Mac to redeem the card. After you click Redeem, click Use Camera, then hold the gift card 4 to 7 inches (10 to 18 centimeters) from the camera. Make sure the code area is near the center of the preview area, then hold the card steady until it’s redeemed.

Purchase in-app content and subscriptions: Some apps sell extra content, including app upgrades, game content, and subscriptions. To make an in-app purchase, enter your Apple ID (or use Touch ID). For more information about subscriptions, see Manage app subscriptions.

View and manage purchased apps

You can view the apps you purchased using your Apple ID in the Purchased list on any of your Mac computers. If you don’t want certain apps to appear in that list, you can hide them. You can also uninstall apps that you no longer need.

View purchased apps

  • Sign in to your account in the App Store, then click Purchased.

Hide and show apps

  • Hide a purchased app: Press and hold the Control key, click the app, then choose Hide Purchase.
  • View hidden apps: Click Store > View My Account, then click Manage (to the right of Hidden Items). In the window that appears, click Unhide for apps that you want to appear in the Purchased list. When you’re finished, click Done.

Uninstall apps

Note: You can’t uninstall apps that are part of macOS, such as Safari and Mail.

  • Drag the app from the Applications folder to the Trash (located at the end of the Dock), then choose Finder > Empty Trash.

To learn how to uninstall using an app’s uninstaller, see Install, update, and uninstall apps.

Update macOS and apps

App Store keeps track of updates for macOS and apps you purchased with your Apple ID.

When an update is available, you receive a notification. You also see a badge in the App Store toolbar and on the App Store icon in the Dock that shows the number of updates available.

Badges in the App Store window and on the App Store icon in the Dock show that updates are available

Update an app from the App Store

  • Update from the Updates pane: Click Updates in the toolbar, then do one of the following:
    • Update all apps now: Click Update All.
    • Update all apps later: Click the disclosure triangle next to Update All, then choose an option.If you choose to install updates tonight, they are installed between 2:00 and 5:00 a.m. If you install updates that require you to restart your Mac, a notification appears prior to the update, so you can delay it if necessary.
  • Update from the Featured, Top Charts, or Categories areas: Click Update.
    App information bubble with Update button

Update macOS from the App Store

  • Click the More link under a macOS update to view update information and see whether updates are available for individual components of macOS (for example, Safari, iTunes, and so on).

    Note: Required security updates are installed automatically.

Update from the Apple menu

  1. To see if you have available updates, open the Apple menu.The number of updates appears to the right of App Store.
  2. To get your updates, choose App Store.
  3. After App Store opens, click Updates in the toolbar.For more instructions, see “Update macOS from the App Store” and “Update an app from the App Store,” above.

Update from an Updates Available notification

If you receive a notification that an app update is available, you can download the update without opening App Store.

  • In the notification, do one of the following:
    • Update all apps now and restart: Click Restart.
    • Update all apps later: Click Later, then choose an option.

Have App Store automatically check for updates

  1. Choose App Store > Preferences.
  2. Select “Automatically check for updates,” then select any of the related options.

For more information, see About required security updates.

Automatically keep macOS and apps up to date

You can automatically download and install macOS and app updates.

  1. Choose App Store > Preferences.
  2. Select “Automatically check for updates,” then select “Install app updates” to have your Mac install app updates automatically, or “Install macOS updates” to have your Mac install macOS updates automatically.

Install and reinstall purchased apps

There are several ways to install and reinstall apps you purchased with your Apple ID or that came with your new Mac.

Note: In the App Store, all purchased apps are listed under Purchased.

Install apps that you purchased on a different computer

You can install apps that you purchased with your Apple ID on other Mac computers.

Note: All of your purchases are tied to your Apple ID account, and can’t be transferred to another Apple ID account. If you bought apps on your iPad, iPhone, or other Mac, sign in using the same Apple ID to see all of your apps on this Mac.

  • Sign in to your account in the App Store, click Purchased, then click Install.

Automatically download apps that you purchased on a different computer

  • Sign in to your account in the App Store with your Apple ID. Choose App Store > Preferences, then select “Automatically download apps purchased on other Macs.”

Reinstall apps

If you uninstalled or deleted an app that you purchased in the App Store, you can install it again.

Note: All of your purchases are tied to your Apple ID account, and can’t be transferred to another Apple ID account. If you bought apps on your iPad, iPhone, or other Mac, sign in using the same Apple ID to see all of your apps on this Mac.

  • Sign in to your account in the App Store, then click Purchased. Locate the app you want, then click Install.

Add preinstalled apps to your account

If your Mac came with preinstalled apps, such as GarageBand, iMovie, and Photos, you can add them to your account.

Do one of the following:

  • Update from the Purchased area: Click Purchased, click Accept, then sign in using the Apple ID for the account you want to add the apps to.
  • Update from the Featured, Top Charts, or Categories area: Locate the app in the Featured, Top Charts, or Categories area, then click Accept.

After preinstalled apps are added to your account, they’re listed with the rest of your purchased apps. If you delete the apps later, you can reinstall them using the instructions above.

Manage app subscriptions

You can change renewal settings for app subscriptions you purchased in the App Store.

  1. Choose Store > View My Account, sign in, then click Manage (next to Subscriptions).
  2. If an app is set to renew automatically, do any of the following:
    • Change your renewal duration: Select a setting in the Renewal Options list.
    • Turn off automatic renewal: Click Cancel Subscription.

You can also download an app from the Internet or install an app from a disc. See Install, update, and uninstall apps for instructions.

Tell people about apps

In App Store, you can rate, review, and tell your friends about apps.

Rate an app you purchased or downloaded: On the app’s description page, click a star next to “Rate this application.”

Write a review of an app you purchased or downloaded: On the app’s description page, click the link below Customer Reviews to write a review. Enter review information, then click Submit.

Tell your friends about an app: Click the info bubble pop-up menu, then choose an option.

App information button showing the pop-up menu for choosing an option for sharing info about an app
  • Copy Link: Create a copy of the link to the app description page. You can paste the link into an email message or a document.
  • Tell a Friend: Send an email about the app.
  • Share on Twitter: Tweet about the app.
  • Share to Facebook: Create a Facebook post about the app.

About required security updates

Your Mac checks daily for required security updates and notifies you when one is available in App Store. If the update does not require you to restart your Mac, it’s installed automatically after a specified amount of time. Otherwise, the update is installed the next time you restart your Mac.

If you prefer, you can always manually install required security updates.

  • Choose App Store > Preferences, then deselect “Install system data files and security updates.”

App Store keyboard shortcuts

App Store includes keyboard shortcuts for common macOS commands and for navigation.

Navigation shortcuts are shown below; look in the menus to find shortcuts for common commands.

Action

Shortcut

Display Featured apps Command-1
Display Top Charts Command-2
Display Categories Command-3
Display Purchased Apps Command-4
Display Updates Command-5
Search for an app Command-F
Refresh the current page Command-R
Go to the previous page Command—Left bracket ( [ )

On a trackpad, swipe two fingers to the left.

If you have a Magic Mouse, swipe one finger to the left.

Go to the next page Command—Right bracket ( ] )

On a trackpad, swipe two fingers to the right.

If you have a Magic Mouse, swipe one finger to the right.

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Siri Tips http://mac.101.freemac.org/siri-tips-2-2/ Thu, 29 Dec 2016 17:51:45 +0000 http://osx.tips.onemac.net/?p=10805

Like Siri on your iOS devices, Siri on your Mac is your intelligent personal assistant that helps you multitask and get things done just by asking. For example, while you work on a document, you can ask Siri to send a message to your coworker saying that the document is on the way—without having to stop what you’re doing.

Here are just a few examples of the many things that you can ask Siri to do:

  • “Show the PDFs in my Downloads folder”
  • “How much free space do I have on my Mac?”
  • “Play the top 40 jazz songs”
  • “What’s the weather in Lake Tahoe?”
  • “Show me all of the files I shared with Cecilia last week”
  • “Search the web for images of the Eiffel Tower”
  • “Find tweets from José Bautista”
  • “FaceTime Victoria”
  • “Add Laura to my 10 AM meeting”
  • “How do you spell broccoli?”
  • “Show my photos from yesterday”
  • “What time is it in Monterrey, Mexico?”

Ask Siri a question

Click the Siri icon  in the menu bar or Dock. Siri asks “What can I help you with?” Then say what you need. 
To learn about Siri’s capabilities on the Mac, just ask Siri “What can you do?”

Click the Siri icon  again or clickmicrophone iconin the search result to ask another question. Siri remains open on your desktop in front of any other apps, or you can close the window with a swipe.

To ask Siri a question, you can instead hold down both the Command (⌘) key and Space bar until Siri asks, “What can I help you with?”

 If you’re using a Mac mini or a Mac Pro, connect a microphone for Siri to hear your requests. Choose Apple menu () > System Preferences and click Sound.
Then select your microphone in the Input tab.

 

Ask Siri to find files on your Mac

Siri makes it easy to find files on your Mac, using various criteria. For example, you can ask Siri to search for all the documents that you opened this week. Then you can ask Siri to refine your results to just the ones with the word “annual” in the title.

 

Keep Siri results where you can find them

You can keep important information from Siri—like sports schedules, Twitter feeds, files that are related to your big project, and much more—right in Notification Center so you can access it easily. Just click plus sign at the top of your Siri results. They’ll even stay up to date, so you always know where to find game times, trending topics, or important documents.

Search and drag Siri results

You can ask Siri to search for information, and then drag the results into a window or application on your desktop. For example, you can ask Siri to find an image on the web, and then you can drag it into your Pages document. Or you can ask Siri to find a restaurant, then drag the location from Maps into an invitation.

Edit your Siri request

To edit your request instead of making a new request, double-click your words in the Siri window, then enter your changes from the keyboard.


Double-click your words to edit them.


Then press Return to search again.

Change Siri settings

Go to System Preferences and click Siri. Or you can just ask Siri to open Siri Preferences.

In Siri Preferences, you can:

  • Turn Siri on or off
  • Change the language or dialect that Siri expects you to use
  • Change the gender and dialect of the voice that Siri uses when speaking to you
  • Turn off voice feedback so that Siri shows results silently

Get help

 

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Where is the Mac #Hash Key? http://mac.101.freemac.org/where-is-the-mac-hash-key/ Thu, 29 Dec 2016 15:25:07 +0000 http://mac.101.freemac.org/?p=10809 Mac keyboards don’t have a # (‘hash’ for the UK, or ‘pound’ if you’re American) key, which is a  bit of a problem when you want to type a # symbol.

The lack of a dedicated key doesn’t mean you can’t type the symbol, though – just type [Alt] + [3] or [⌥] + [3] (depending on your keyboard) and the # symbol will appear.

There’s just one thing to note – you need to press the [3] key on the top row of number keys as the [3] key on the numeric keyboard won’t work.

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Disable System Integrity Protection (SIP) http://mac.101.freemac.org/disable-system-integrity-protection-sip/ Tue, 27 Dec 2016 20:33:03 +0000 http://mac.101.freemac.org/?p=10803 MacOS Sierra has a stricter Gatekeeper with not allowing Apps from unidentified developers and as a result will annoy us with saying that application is damaged and cannot be opened.

How to Disable System Integrity Protection (SIP) for MacOS Sierra?

With the following 2 options:

Option 1

For a certain application run in Terminal:

sudo xattr -rd com.apple.quarantine /Applications/LockedApp.app

Option 2

To disable checks globally (example: allow apps from anywhere) run in Terminal:

sudo spctl --master-disable

 

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FileVault http://mac.101.freemac.org/filevault/ Sat, 20 Aug 2016 23:04:07 +0000 http://mac.101.freemac.org/?p=10781

Turn on and set up FileVault

FileVault 2 is available in OS X Lion or later. When FileVault is turned on, your Mac always requires that you log in with your OS X account password.

  1. Choose Apple menu () > System Preferences, then click Security & Privacy.
  2. Click the FileVault tab.
  3. Click the Lock Locked button, then enter an administrator name and password.
  4. Click Turn On FileVault.

If other users have accounts on your Mac, you might see a message that each user must type in their password before they will be able to unlock the disk. For each user, click the Enable User button and enter the user’s password. OS X automatically enables any user accounts that you add after turning on FileVault.

Choose how you want to be able to unlock your disk and reset your password, in case you ever forget your password:

  • If you’re using OS X Mavericks, you can choose to store a FileVault recovery key with Apple by providing the questions and answers to three security questions. Choose answers that you’re sure to remember.*
  • If you’re using OS X Yosemite or later, you can choose to use your iCloud account to unlock your disk and reset your password.*
  • If you don’t want to use iCloud FileVault recovery, you can create a local recovery key. Keep the letters and numbers of the key somewhere safe—other than on your encrypted startup disk.

If you lose or forget both your OS X account password and your FileVault recovery key, you won’t be able to log in to your Mac or access the data on your startup disk.

When FileVault setup is complete, your Mac restarts and asks you to log in with your account password. Your password unlocks your disk and allows your Mac to finish starting up. FileVault requires that you log in every time your Mac starts up, and no account is permitted to log in automatically.

After your Mac starts up, encryption of your startup disk occurs in the background as you use your Mac. This takes time, and it happens only while your Mac is awake and plugged in to AC power. You can check progress in the FileVault section of Security & Privacy preferences. Any new files that you create are automatically encrypted as they’re saved to your startup disk.

Reset your password or change your FileVault recovery key

If you forget your OS X account password or it doesn’t work, you might be able to reset your password.

If you want to change the recovery key used to encrypt your startup disk, turn off FileVault in Security & Privacy preferences. You can then turn it on again to generate a new key and disable all older keys.

Turn off FileVault

If you no longer want to encrypt your startup disk, you can turn off FileVault:

  1. Choose Apple menu > System Preferences, then click Security & Privacy.
  2. Click the FileVault tab.
  3. Click the Lock Locked button, then enter an administrator name and password.
  4. Click Turn Off FileVault.
  5. Restart your Mac.

After your Mac starts up, decryption of your startup disk occurs in the background as you use your Mac. This takes time, and it happens only while your Mac is awake and plugged in to AC power. You can check progress in the FileVault section of Security & Privacy preferences.

Learn more

  • Learn how to create and deploy a FileVault recovery key for Mac computers in your company, school, or other institution.
  • If you’re using FileVault in Mac OS X Snow Leopard, you can upgrade to FileVault 2 by upgrading to OS X Lion or later. After upgrading OS X, open FileVault preferences and follow the onscreen instructions to upgrade FileVault.
  • RAID partitions or non-standard Boot Camp partitions on the startup drive might prevent OS X from installing a local Recovery System. Without a Recovery System, FileVault won’t encrypt your startup drive. Learn more.

 

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Firmware Passwords http://mac.101.freemac.org/firmware-passwords/ Sat, 20 Aug 2016 23:01:53 +0000 http://mac.101.freemac.org/?p=10779
To protect the data on your Mac, you can set a user account password to prevent unauthorized users from logging in. You can also encrypt your startup disk using FileVault so that unauthorized users can’t read the data stored on your Mac without the right password.

For additional protection, you can also set a firmware password on your Mac. A firmware password prevents your Mac from starting up from any device other than your designated startup disk.

You can set a firmware password on these Macs:

When you set a firmware password, make sure it’s one you’ll remember. You might want to write it down somewhere so that you don’t forget it. If you forget your firmware password, you’ll need to bring your Mac to an Apple Retail Store or Apple Authorized Service Provider to unlock your Mac.

Set a firmware password

Follow these steps to set a firmware password on your Mac using OS X Mavericks or later.

  1. Shut down your Mac.
  2. Start up your Mac again and immediately hold the Command and R keys after you hear the startup sound to start from OS X Recovery.
  3. When the Recovery window appears, choose Firmware Password Utility from the Utilities menu.
  4. In the Firmware Utility window that appears, click Turn On Firmware Password.
  5. Enter a new password, then enter the same password in the Verify field.
  6. Click Set Password.
  7. Click Quit Firmware Utility to close the Firmware Password Utility.
  8. Click the Apple menu and choose Restart or Shutdown. The next time your Mac starts up, your firmware password is active.

Unlock your Mac using a firmware password

When you start your Mac from your normal startup disk, you see the normal login window where you enter your user account password. If you try to start up from another drive, or from OS X Recovery, your Mac pauses startup and displays a lock icon with a password field instead.

Click the password field and enter your firmware password. Then press Return to unlock your Mac and continue starting up.

Find My Mac

When you use Find My Mac to lock your Mac, it also prevents your Mac from starting up by setting a firmware-based password. As soon as it receives the lock instruction from iCloud, your Mac displays a lock screen that has four to six blank fields.

To unlock your Mac, enter the code you created when you locked your Mac from the Find My Mac website.

If you forget your firmware password

If you can’t remember the password you set using the Firmware Password Utility or Find My Mac, schedule a service appointment with an Apple Retail Store or Apple Authorized Service Provider. Bring your proof of purchase (original receipt or invoice) with you. If you plan to visit an Apple Retail Store, make a reservation (available only in some countries).

 

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OS X Recovery http://mac.101.freemac.org/os-x-recovery-2/ Sat, 20 Aug 2016 22:57:56 +0000 http://mac.101.freemac.org/?p=10777 OS X Recovery is part of the built-in recovery system on your Mac. You can use its utilities to recover from certain software issues or take other actions on your Mac.

Start up from OS X Recovery

To start up from OS X Recovery, hold down Command (⌘)-R immediately after turning on or restarting your Mac. Release when you see the Apple logo. If you can’t start up from OS X Recovery, try holding down Option-Command-R to start up from OS X Internet Recovery*.

Startup is complete when you see the OS X Utilities window.

OS X Utilities window

To quit OS X Utilities, choose Restart or Shut Down from the Apple menu (). To start up from a different startup disk, if available, choose Startup Disk from the Apple menu, then select a startup disk and click Restart.

Use the utilities in OS X Recovery

After starting up from OS X Recovery (or OS X Internet Recovery), select from these utilities, then click Continue:

  • Restore From Time Machine Backup: Restore your Mac from an external hard drive or Time Capsule that contains a Time Machine backup of your Mac.
  • Reinstall OS X*: Download and reinstall OS X on your startup disk. OS X Recovery (Command-R) installs the version of OS X that was last installed on your Mac. OS X Internet Recovery (Option-Command-R) installs the version that originally came with your Mac.
  • Get Help Online*: Use Safari to browse the web and find help for your Mac. Links to Apple’s support website are included. Browser plug-ins and extensions are disabled.
  • Disk Utility: Use Disk Utility to repair or erase your startup disk or other hard disk.

These other utilities are available from the Utilities menu in the menu bar:

 

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Reinstall OS X http://mac.101.freemac.org/reinstall-os-x/ Sat, 20 Aug 2016 22:54:38 +0000 http://mac.101.freemac.org/?p=10775

If you’re selling or giving away your Mac

Begin by completing the other steps to prepare for selling or giving away your Mac. Then take these additional steps to reinstall OS X in a way that cleans your Mac of anything associated with you, your data, or your Apple ID.

  1. Start up from OS X Internet Recovery by holding down Option-Command-R immediately after turning on or restarting your Mac. Release the keys when you see the Apple logo. Startup is complete when you see the OS X Utilities window.
  2. Open Disk Utility from the OS X Utilities window, then use Disk Utility to erase your built-in hard disk using the OS X Extended (Journaled) format. Quit Disk Utility when done.
  3. Choose Reinstall OS X from the OS X Utilities window, then follow the onscreen instructions.
    This installs the OS X that came with your Mac when it was new. This version isn’t associated with your Apple ID. The new owner can then use the Mac App Store to upgrade OS X with their Apple ID.
    OS X Utilities window
  4. When done, your Mac restarts to a setup assistant. Press Command (⌘)-Q, then click Shut Down. That way the new owner can complete the steps of the setup assistant using their own information.

If you’re reinstalling for other reasons

OS X can be installed over the same version or earlier version of OS X, without removing your data. You don’t need to remove or disable the existing system first.

  1. Start up from OS X Recovery by holding Command-R immediately after turning on or restarting your Mac. Release the keys when you see the Apple logo. Startup is complete when you see the OS X Utilities window.
  2. If you do want to erase your disk before reinstalling OS X, open Disk Utility from the OS X Utilities window, then use Disk Utility to erase the disk. Quit Disk Utility when done.
    Erasing the disk isn’t necessary unless you’re transferring your Mac to a new owner, partitioning your disk for use with Boot Camp, or attempting to resolve an issue that Disk Utility can’t repair
  3. Choose Reinstall OS X from the OS X Utilities window, then follow the onscreen instructions.
    This installs the latest version of OS X that was previously installed on your Mac.

Other ways to reinstall OS X:

  • If you made a Time Machine backup of your Mac, you can restore OS X from that backup. This erases the disk you’re restoring, then replaces everything on that disk with OS X and other data from the backup. To proceed, start up from OS X Recovery, then choose Restore From Time Machine Backup and follow the onscreen instructions.
  • Or open the App Store on your Mac, then click Purchased in the toolbar to see items that you previously downloaded with your Apple ID. Find the currently installed version of OS X in the list, then click the Download button. After downloading, the OS X installer opens automatically.

Learn more

To download and reinstall OS X using OS X Recovery, you need a broadband Internet connection that meets the following requirements. If you don’t know what to do, try a different Internet connection, such as at your work or another home.

  • The connection is configured to use DHCP over Wi-Fi or Ethernet, not PPPoE (if there is no router handling the PPPoE connection).
  • The connection is not using 802.1X or other certificate-based authentication.
  • The connection is not using a proxy server configured in Network preferences.
  • If the connection is using the WEP or WPA-Enterprise security protocols, you can use OS X Recovery. If the connection is using WPA/WPA2, you can use OS X Recovery or OS X Internet Recovery.
  • If the connection is using a captive network, such as a network that displays a login or agreement page before you can access the Internet, you can use OS X Recovery but not OS X Internet Recovery.

When you download OS X using OS X Recovery, your computer’s serial number is sent to Apple to help authenticate your request.

 

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Downgrade macOS Sierra to El Capitan http://mac.101.freemac.org/downgrade-macos-sierra-to-el-capitan/ Sun, 10 Jul 2016 09:43:18 +0000 http://mac.downloads.freemac.org/?p=10773 hero-macos_large

There are three key aspects when you are considering a downgrade from macOS Sierra to El Capitan. These are as follows:

  1. First You will have to Erase the macOS Sierra from your Mac
  2. Next you will have to Re-install El Capitan
  3. Check that your System is stable

Usually this process is pretty easy and safe if you had chosen a second partition for using the beta install. It is always a good idea to do so if you are trying to install a beta edition of the OS X.

Lets proceed with the detailed steps for each of the above milestones. Please make sure that your machine is  connected to a wi-fi with internet access before your proceed.

Erasing the existing macOS Sierra

  • Restart your Mac from the  menu
  • Hold Down Command +R keys together upon hearing the chime and hold the keys till you see the Apple logo appear on the screen. This launches your Mac into the recovery mode
  • Select Disk Utility from your OS X utilities
  • Select the indented volume name of your startup disk from the left side of the Disk Utility window, then click the Erase tab.
  • Type in Macintosh HD for the name as Mac OS Extended from the format list and then choose Erase
  • Close the Disk Utility window

Reinstall El Capitan

Now that the macOS Sierra has been erased from your drive, you will need to re-install the OS X El Capitan.

  • Re-install OS X from OS X utilities and choose the OS X El Capitan Installer.once the process is complete, restart the Mac.
  • Invoke Recovery mode while the Mac is starting up by pressing together the Command + R keys.
  • Open your OS X Utilities. From your OS X Utilities menu, click Restore from Time Machine Backup. We are assuming that you had made a complete backup before installing the macOS beta on your machine.
  • Select your Time Machine backup disk
  • Select the backup you want to restore from
  • Click Continue and follow the instructions to reinstall OS X and your backed up files.

Check Your System

  • At this point, you have erased macOS Sierra and re-installed El Capitan. Restart your Mac and you should be all set to go.
  • In the case, you run into issues in starting your Mac or Macbook after the El Capitan re-install, you may have to check some of your kext settings if you hadn’t already taken care of it prior to the beta install.

 

 

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