Folders – Mac101 – Get one to one with your Mac ! http://mac.101.freemac.org Tue, 10 Jan 2017 11:49:57 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.6 Dock Tips http://mac.101.freemac.org/dock-tips/ Wed, 04 Jan 2017 10:09:00 +0000 http://osx.tips.onemac.net/?p=10840 The Dock is the bar of icons that sits at the bottom or side of your screen. It provides easy access to many of the apps that come with your Mac (like MailSafari, and Messages). You can add your own apps, documents and folders to the Dock, too.

image of the Dock

To use an item in the Dock, click its icon. If you want to listen to some music, click the iTunes icon (the icon with music notes) to open iTunes. To check your email, click the Mail icon (it looks like a stamp).

When an application is open, the Dock displays an illuminated dash beneath the application’s icon. To make any currently running application the active one, click its icon in the Dock.

Organizing the Dock

The Dock keeps apps on its left side. Folders, documents, and minimized windows are kept on the right side of the Dock. If you look closely, you can see a vertical separator line that separates these two sides.

the trash icon in the dock

If you want to rearrange where an icon appears on the Dock, just drag it to another location in the Dock. The Trash and the Finder are special items, so they are always present at each end of the Dock.

Adding and removing Dock items

If you want to add an application to the Dock, click the Launchpad icon in the Dock. Then, drag an app icon from the Launchpad to the Dock. The icons in the Dock move aside to make room for the new item. If you want to add a file or folder to the Dock, just drag its icon from any Finder window (or the desktop) and drop it on the Dock.

To remove an item from the Dock, drag its icon an inch or more off the Dock and wait a couple seconds. Then release the icon and it disappears in a poof of smoke.

dragging an icon off the Dock

Removing an item from the Dock doesn’t permanently remove it from your computer. If you want that item back in the Dock, locate the app, file, or folder in the Finder or Launchpad, and simply drag it back into the Dock.

Learn more

To learn more about the Dock, click a topic below. You can also search for the word “Dock” from the Help menu at the top of your screen.

Minimizing Windows

If you minimize a window (click the round, yellow button in the upper-left corner of any window), the window is pulled down into the Dock. It’s held there until you click its icon to bring up the window again.

 

Stacks

You can also choose how to display folders in the Dock. You can either view them as a folder icon, or as a stack.

dock stack

Stacks display a folder’s contents as a fan or grid when you click them in the Dock. Learn more about Stacks here.

 

The Trash

The Dock includes the Trash (its icon looks like a waste basket). Drag any documents you no longer want to the Trash to get rid of them.

When you move items to the Trash, you haven’t completely deleted them. You can click the Trash icon in the Dock to see what it contains. When you’re ready to permanently delete files or folders that you’ve dragged to the Trash, click and hold the Trash icon in the Dock and choose Empty Trash.

the trash icon in the dock

If you drag a disk or other mounted volume to the Trash, it changes to an eject icon to let you know that this action ejects or removes the item rather than erasing or deleting it.

eject icon in dock

 

If you don’t see the Dock

You can also set the Dock so that it isn’t visible until you need it. If you don’t see the dock, try moving your pointer to the bottom or side of your screen to see if it appears. To turn Dock hiding on or off, choose Dock > Turn Hiding On or Turn Hiding Off from the Apple () menu.

 

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Folder Basics http://mac.101.freemac.org/folder-basics/ Mon, 02 Jan 2017 14:10:25 +0000 http://osx.tips.onemac.net/?p=10824

Everything on your Mac – Documents, Pictures, Music, Apps, and more, is organized in folders. As you create documents, install apps, and do other work, you can create new folders to keep yourself organized.

See your files in the Finder

The Finder is the home base for your Mac. The Finder icon looks like a blue smiling face; click the icon in the Dock to open a Finder window.
Finder icon in Dock

You use Finder windows to organize and access almost everything on your Mac.

Example of a Finder window

See your stuff

Click items in the Finder sidebar to see your files, apps, downloads, and more. To make the sidebar even more useful, customize it.

Use folders … or don’t

If you like organizing your files in folders, you can do that. It’s easy to create new folders in your Documents folder, on the desktop, or in iCloud Drive. For more information about iCloud Drive, see Store documents with iCloud Drive.

If you’d rather avoid folders, use All My Files. All of the files on your Mac and in iCloud are there. You can also use tags to organize your files.

Choose your view

You can choose how you view the items in Finder windows. For example, you don’t have to view your items in a list—Cover Flow lets you flip through your files and folders visually.

Send it with AirDrop

You can send a file to a nearby iOS device or Mac right from the Finder. Click AirDrop in the sidebar to get started. For more information, see Use AirDrop to send files to devices near you.

You can also select a file in the Finder, then click the Share button  to share it using Mail, Messages, Twitter, Facebook, and more.

Create a folder

  1. Click the desktop if you want to create the folder on the desktop; otherwise, open a Finder window and navigate to where you want to create the folder.

  2. Choose File > New Folder, or press Shift-Command-N.

    If the New Folder command is dimmed, you can’t create a folder in the current location. For example, you can’t create a folder in the All My Files section of the Finder sidebar.

  3. Enter a name for the folder, then press Return.

Move items into folders

Do any of the following:

Put an item in a folder: Drag it to the folder.

Put several items in a folder: Select the items, then drag one of the items to the folder.

All selected items move to the folder.

Keep an item in its original location and put a copy in a folder: Hold down the Option key, then drag the item to the folder.

Keep an item in its original location and put an alias for it in a new folder: Hold down the Option and Command keys, then drag the item to the folder.

Make a copy of an item within the same folder: Select the item, then choose File > Duplicate or press Command-D.

Copy files to a different disk: Drag the files to the disk. To move files to a different disk without copying them, hold down the Command key, then drag the files to the disk.

Quickly group multiple items into a folder

You can quickly create a folder of items on the desktop or in a Finder window.

  1. Select all the items you want to group together.

  2. Control-click one of the selected items, then choose New Folder with Selection.

  3. Enter a name for the folder, then press Return.

Merge two folders with the same name

If you have two folders with identical names at two different locations, you can merge them into a single folder.

Hold down the Option key, then drag one folder to the location that contains a folder with the same name. In the dialog that appears, click Merge.

The Merge option appears only if one of the folders contains items that are not in the other folder. If the folders contain different versions of identically named files, the only options are Stop or Replace.

To organize your files automatically, use Smart Folders. Smart Folders automatically gather files by type and subject matter, and are instantly updated as you change, add, and remove files on your Mac.

Rename files, folders, and disks

You can change the name of most files, folders, and disks, including the internal hard disk (named Macintosh HD by default). If you change the name of your hard disk, it still appears with its original name on a network.

Rename one item

  1. Select the item in a Finder window or on the desktop, then press Return. Or force click the item’s name.

  2. Enter a new name.

    You can use numbers and most symbols. You can’t include a colon (:) or start the name with a period (.). Some apps may not allow you to use a slash (/) in a filename.

  3. Press Return.

Rename multiple items

  1. Select the items in a Finder window or on the desktop, then Control-click one of them.

  2. In the shortcut menu, select Rename Items.

  3. In the pop-up menu below Rename Finder Items, choose to replace text in the names, add text to the names, or change the name format.

    • Replace text: Enter the text you want to remove in the Find field, then enter the text you want to add in the “Replace with” field.

    • Add text: Enter the text you want to add in the field, then choose to add the text before or after the current name.

    • Format: Choose a name format for the files, then choose to put the index, counter, or date before or after the name. Enter a name in the Custom Format field, then enter the number you want to start with.

  4. Click Rename.

These are some items you should not rename:

  • App folders and any items that came with your system, such as the Library folder. (If you change the name of an item and experience problems, change the name back. If this doesn’t help, you may need to reinstall the software.)

  • Filename extensions—the period followed by a few letters or words that you see at the end of some filenames (for example, .jpg). If you change an extension, you may no longer be able to open the file with the app that was used to create it.

  • Your home folder—the one with your name on it.

Open folders in new Finder tabs or windows

When you open a folder in the Finder, the folder’s contents usually replace the current contents of the window. If you prefer, you can open a folder in a new tab or window.

Set folders to open in tabs or windows

  1. In the Finder, choose Finder > Preferences, then click General.

  2. Select or deselect “Open folders in tabs instead of new windows.”

Open folders in tabs or windows

Press the Command key while you double-click the folder.

The folder opens in a new tab or window, depending on your Finder preferences.

Tip:   If the Finder toolbar and sidebar are hidden, double-clicking a folder without pressing the Command key opens the folder in a new window.

To open a new Finder window without opening a specific folder, choose File > New Finder Window or press Command-N.

Work with tabs

If all of your tabs aren’t visible, scroll through them.

When two or more tabs are open, click the Add button  to open a new tab.

To close a tab, place the pointer over the tab, then click the Delete button .

Customize the Finder toolbar and sidebar

There are several ways to customize the Finder toolbar and Finder sidebar.

Before you start, open a Finder window by clicking the Finder icon at the left end of the Dock.

Finder icon in Dock

Customize the toolbar

Hide or show the toolbar: Choose View > Hide Toolbar, or View > Show Toolbar.

Hiding the toolbar also hides the sidebar, and moves the status bar from the bottom to the top of the window.

Resize the toolbar: If you see angle brackets  at the right end of the toolbar, it means the window is too small to show all of the toolbar items. Enlarge the window or click the brackets to see the rest of the items.

Change what’s in the toolbar: Choose View > Customize Toolbar. You can drag items into and out of the toolbar, add a space between items, and choose whether to show text with the icons.

Rearrange the items in the toolbar: Hold down the Command key, then drag an item to a new location.

Add a file or app: Hold down the Command key, then drag the item to the Finder toolbar until a green plus sign (+) appears.

Remove an item: Hold down the Command key, then drag the item out of the toolbar.

Customize the sidebar

Hide or show the sidebar: Choose View > Hide Sidebar or View > Show Sidebar. (If Show Sidebar is dimmed, choose View > Show Toolbar.)

Resize the sidebar: Drag the right side of the divider bar to the right or left.

Change what’s in the sidebar: Choose Finder > Preferences, click Sidebar, then select or deselect items.

Rearrange items in the sidebar: Drag an item to a new location. You can’t rearrange items in the Shared section.

Show or hide all the items in a section: Position the pointer over the section head until you see Hide or Show appear, then click the Hide or Show button. For example, to hide temporarily your Favorites, position the pointer over the Favorites heading in the sidebar and click the Hide button.

Add a file, folder, or disk: Hold down the Command key, then drag the item to the Favorites section.

If you don’t see the Favorites section, go to Finder > Preferences > Sidebar, then select at least one item in the section.

Add an app: Hold down the Command key, then drag its icon to the Favorites section.

Remove an item: Drag the item icon out of the sidebar until you see a gray remove sign (x).

The sidebar link disappears, but the original item is still on your Mac. You can’t remove items from the Shared section.

To change other Finder preferences, choose Finder > Preferences. For more information, see Finder preferences.

To set the scrolling behavior for Finder (and other) windows, choose Apple menu > System Preferences, then click General.

 

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Share files, folders, and other services http://mac.101.freemac.org/share-files-folders-and-other-services/ Sun, 26 Oct 2014 17:51:07 +0000 http://mac.tips.and.tricks.onemac.net/?p=2774 Share files, folders, and other servicesYou can set up your Mac to share files, folders, and other services with users on your network. You can also share your screen, or share a printer connected to your Mac.

Use the information on this page to help you choose which services to share, and whom to share with.

DVD or CD sharing

If you install the DVD or CD Sharing Setup software, users of other computers should be able to access your DVD or CD drive. This can be helpful if the other computer doesn’t have an optical drive, or if you want to provide access to your optical drive to other computers on your Ethernet or wireless network.

Share your optical drive with another computer

You can share discs in your computer’s DVD drive with other computers on your network.

  • Open Sharing preferences if it isn’t already open (choose Apple menu > System Preferences, click Sharing), then select the DVD or CD Sharing checkbox.

    Open Sharing preferences for me

  • To be notified when a computer tries to access your optical drive, select “Ask me before allowing others to use my DVD drive.”

Screen sharing

You can let others see what’s on your screen; open, move, and close files and windows; open apps; and even restart your Mac.

Screen Sharing pref pane

You can let others view your computer screen on their own Mac. While your screen is being shared, the user of the other Mac sees what’s on your screen and can open, move, and close files and windows, open apps, and even restart your Mac.

  1. Open Sharing preferences if it isn’t already open (choose Apple menu > System Preferences, then click Sharing).

    Open Sharing preferences for me

  2. Select the Screen Sharing checkbox.

    If Remote Management is selected, you must deselect it before you can select Screen Sharing.

  3. To specify who can share your screen, select one of the following:

    • All users: Anyone with a user account on your Mac can share your screen.

    • Only these users: Screen sharing is restricted to specific users.

  4. If you selected “Only these users,” click Add  at the bottom of the users list, then do one of the following:

    • Select a user from Users & Groups, which includes all the users of your Mac.

    • Select a user from Network Users or Network Groups, which includes everyone on your network.

  5. To let others share your screen without having a user account on your Mac, click Computer Settings, then select one or both of the following:

    • Anyone may request permission to control screen: Before other computer users begin screen sharing your Mac, they can ask for permission instead of entering a user name and password.

    • VNC viewers may control screen with password: Other users can share your screen using a VNC viewer app—on iPad or a Windows PC, for example—by entering the password you specify here.

    If this computer’s screen is shared only by other OS X users, turn off these options and add accounts for the other users.

File sharing

You can share files with other Mac computers:

Share your Mac with everyone, or restrict the sharing service to allow specific users access to only certain folders.

File Sharing pref pane

You can share files and folders with others on your network. You can share your entire Mac with everyone, or allow specific users access to only certain folders.

  1. Open Sharing preferences if it isn’t already open (choose Apple menu > System Preferences, then click Sharing).

    Open Sharing preferences for me

  2. Select the File Sharing checkbox.

  3. To select a specific folder to share, click Add  at the bottom of the Shared Folders list, locate the folder, select it, then click Add.

    The Public folder of each user with an account on your Mac is shared automatically. To prevent a folder from being shared, select it in the Shared Folders list and click Delete .

  4. By default, any user set up on your Mac in Users & Groups preferences can connect to your Mac over the network. A user with an administrator account can access your entire Mac.

    To give only specific users access to a folder, select the folder in the Shared Folders list, then click Add  at the bottom of the Users list. Then do one of the following:

    • Select a user from Users & Groups, which includes all the users of your Mac.

    • Select a user from Network Users or Network Groups, which includes everyone on your network.

    • Select a person from your contacts. Create a password for the person, then click Create Account.

  5. To specify the amount of access for a user, select the user in the Users list, click the triangles next to the user name, then choose one of the following:

    • Read & Write: The user can see and copy files to and from the folder.

    • Read Only: The user can view the contents of the folder but can’t copy files to it.

    • Write Only (Drop Box): The user can copy files to the folder but can’t view its contents.

    • No Access: The user can’t see or copy files from the folder.

  6. OS X allows guests to access shared folders on your Mac. To turn off guest access, deselect “Allow guests to connect to shared folders” in the Guest Account pane of User & Groups preferences.

Open Users & Groups preferences for me

Printer sharing

If you have a printer connected to your Mac, you can let others on your network use it.

Printer Sharing prefs

You can share your printer with another Mac or with a UNIX computer. The computers must be on the same local network as your Mac, and the Mac users must have Mac OS X v10.4 or later.

Printer sharing is for non-network or non-wireless printers that typically are plugged in directly to your computer. You don’t need to share network, wireless, or AirPrint compatible printers because they are already shared on your network.

  1. Open Sharing preferences if it isn’t already open (choose Apple menu > System Preferences and click Sharing), then select the Printer Sharing checkbox.

    Open Sharing preferences for me

  2. Below Printers, select the printer you want to share.

    When you share a printer, all users on your network (“Everyone”) can use it by default. If you want to restrict access to specific people, continue with steps 3 and 4.

  3. Click Add  at the bottom of the Users list, then do any of the following:

    • Select a user from Users & Groups, which includes all the users of your Mac.

    • Select a user from Network Users or Network Groups, which includes everyone on your network.

    • Select a person from your contacts. Create a password for the person, then click Create Account.

  4. When you add people to the Users list, access to the shared printer is reset to No Access for users on your network (“Everyone”). To provide access to Everyone again, click the triangles, then choose Can Print.

To remove a user, select the name, then click Remove . You can’t remove Everyone.

Remote login

If you allow remote login, you can use Secure Shell (SSH) to log in to your Mac from another location.

Remote login pref pane

If you allow remote login, you can use Secure Shell (SSH) to log in to your Mac from another computer.

You can’t use Telnet to log in to your Mac.

Set up Remote Login

  1. On your Mac, open Sharing preferences if it isn’t already open (choose Apple menu > System Preferences, then click Sharing).

    Open Sharing preferences for me

  2. Select Remote Login.

    Selecting Remote Login also enables the secure FTP (sftp) service.

  3. Specify which users can log in:

    • All users: Any of your computer’s users and anyone on your network can log in.

    • Only these users: Click Add , then choose who can log in remotely. Users & Groups include all the users of your Mac; Network Users and Network Groups include people on your network.

Log in from another computer

To log in from another computer, open Terminal (or another SSH app) on that computer, then type:

ssh username@IP address

For example, if your user name is steve, and your computer’s IP address is 10.1.2.3, open Terminal on the other Mac and type:

ssh steve@10.1.2.3

Don’t know your user name and the IP address for your Mac? It’s easy to find them. Open the Remote Login pane of Sharing preferences; your user name and IP address are shown below the “Remote Login: On” indicator.

Open the Remote Login pane of Sharing preferences for me

Allowing remote login to your Mac can make it less secure. For more information about keeping your Mac secure, see Protect your Mac.

For more information about using the ssh command, type “man ssh” at a Terminal shell prompt.

man page for ssh

Remote Management

If your Mac is remotely managed using Apple Remote Desktop, turn on remote management in Sharing preferences.

Remote Management pref pane

If you are sharing your screen and Mac using Remote Desktop, use Remote Management instead of Screen Sharing in Sharing preferences.

  1. Open Sharing preferences if it isn’t already open (choose Apple menu > System Preferences, then click Sharing), then select the Remote Management checkbox.

    Open Sharing preferences for me

  2. Do one of the following:

    • Select “All users” to let all users on your network connect to your Mac using Apple Remote Desktop.

    • Select “Only these users,” click Add , then select the users who can share your Mac using Apple Remote Desktop.

  3. Click Options, then select the tasks remote users are permitted to perform.

  4. Click Computer Settings, then select options for your Mac. If people connect using a VNC viewer, you need to set a password.

Apple Remote Desktop is available from the App Store. For help setting up and using Apple Remote Desktop, see Remote Desktop Help.

Open App Store for me

Remote Desktop Help

Remote Apple events

Set your Mac to respond to events sent from other computers on a network.

Remote Apple Events pref pane

Your Mac can accept Apple events from apps running on other computers. An Apple event is a task being performed on a Mac, such as “open this document” or “print.”

With remote Apple events turned on, an AppleScript program running on another Mac can interact with your Mac. For example, the program could open and print a document that’s located on your Mac.

  1. Open Sharing preferences if it isn’t already open (choose Apple menu > System Preferences, then click Sharing).

    Open Sharing preferences for me

  2. Select the Remote Apple Events checkbox.

  3. Specify who can send events:

    • All users: Any of your computer’s users and anyone on your network can send events.

    • Only these users: Click Add , then choose who can send events. Users & Groups include all the users of your computer; Network Users and Network Groups include people on your network.

For more information about AppleScript, see the AppleScript website.

Internet sharing

Share your Internet connection with other computers on your local network.

Internet Sharing pref pane

You can share your Internet connection with other users on your local network.

  1. Open Sharing preferences if it isn’t already open (choose Apple menu > System Preferences, then click Sharing).

    Open Sharing preferences for me

  2. Select the Internet Sharing checkbox.

  3. Click the “Share your connection from” pop-up menu, then choose the Internet connection you want to share. For example, if you’re connected to the Internet over Ethernet, choose Ethernet.

  4. Select how you want to share your Internet connection in the “To computers using” list. For example, if you want to share your Internet connection over Wi-Fi, select Wi-Fi.

    If you share your Internet connection using Wi-Fi, deselect the Internet Sharing checkbox, click Wi-Fi Options, give your network a name and password, then select the Internet Sharing checkbox again.

If your Internet connection and your local network use the same port (Ethernet, for example), investigate possible side effects before you turn on Internet sharing. In some cases, sharing your Internet connection disrupts the network. If you use a cable modem, for example, you might unintentionally affect the network settings of other ISP customers, and your ISP might terminate your service.

Bluetooth sharing

If your Mac is Bluetooth enabled or you have a Bluetooth USB adapter connected to your Mac, you can share files with other Bluetooth enabled computers and devices.

Bluetooth Sharing pref pane
  1. Open Sharing preferences if it isn’t already open (choose Apple menu > System Preferences, then click Sharing).

    Open Sharing preferences for me

  2. Select the Bluetooth Sharing checkbox and set the following options:

    • When receiving items: Choose Accept and Save to save all items sent to your Mac; choose Accept and Open to open the items; or choose “Ask what to do” to decide what to do each time a file is sent. If you don’t want to accept any items sent to your Mac, choose Never Allow.

    • Folder for accepted items: Choose the folder in which you want to store accepted files. The default folder is the Downloads folder. Choose Other to select a different folder.

    • When other devices browse: Choose Always Allow to let devices browse your Mac, or choose Ask What to Do to manually decide what to do each time a device tries to browse your Mac. If you don’t want other devices to browse your Mac, choose Never Allow.

    • Folders others can browse: Choose the folder on your Mac that other devices can browse. The default folder is the Public folder. Choose Other to select a different folder.

To set options for what happens when others try to send you files or browse your Mac using Bluetooth, open Bluetooth File Exchange, then choose Help > Bluetooth Help.

Open Bluetooth File Exchange for me

Share the contents of the Clipboard with another Mac

Transfer information between the Clipboards of the two computers

When you’re sharing one computer’s screen with another computer, you can transfer information between the Clipboards of the two computers. For example, you can:

  • Copy text and images from documents on one Mac and paste them into documents on the other.

  • Select and drag text and images from one Mac to the other.

  • Copy a link from your web browser and paste it into a web browser on the other Mac.

  • Copy text from a document on one Mac and drop it on the desktop of the other Mac to create a clipping.

  1. Start a screen sharing session with a Mac on your network. See Share the screen of another Mac.

  2. Choose Edit  > Use Shared Clipboard.

 

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Applications, Files, and Folders http://mac.101.freemac.org/applications-files-and-folders/ Mon, 09 Apr 2012 14:10:00 +0000 http://onetip.onemac.org/2012/04/09/applications-files-and-folders/

An application is a computer program that gives you the tools to accomplish specific tasks. For example, you’re probably using the application Safari right now to read this webpage. Other applications include Mail, iTunes, Pages, TextEdit, and many more.

Accessing an application
To open an application, click the Launchpad icon in Dock or click the application’s icon in Dock (if it’s there). Depending on the application, it may display an interface window, palettes, tool bar, or other interface components, or it could display nothing at all until you open a file or create a new one.

Your Mac’s applications can be accessed from the Launchpad icon in the Dock

To quit an application, choose Quit from the application menu or press Command-Q. Keep in mind that closing a window (by clicking the round, red button) will typically not quit the application.

Getting more applications
You can purchase and install applications for your Mac from App Store, which is included with OS X Lion and Mac OS X v10.6.6 and later. To start browsing software from App Store, click the App Store icon in the Dock. You can use the search field in the upper-right corner of the App Store window to search for applications.

 
You can use App Store to find, install, update, and view purchased applications
  1. Featured – Click to browse new and noteworthy applications.
  2. Top Charts – Click to browse the most popular applications.
  3. Categories – Click to browse applications in specific categories, such as Photography. You can browse applications in a particular category by choosing an item from the All Categories pop-up menu in the Quick Links section. The Quick Links sections is located in the upper-right part of the window displayed when you click Categories.
  4. Purchases – Click to browse applications you have purchased.
  5. Updates – Click to browse updates to applications you have installed on your Mac.
  6. Search Field – Enter a name or type of application your looking for and press Return.

To use App Store, you need to sign up for an Apple ID. If you already have an iTunes Store account or other Apple account, you can use that Apple ID.

Accessing files
To access your files on your Mac, you use Finder. Finder allows you to see all files and folders on your Mac and search for them using the search field in the top-right corner of the Finder window. Once you find a file you want to open, simply double-click the file, it will open in the application that supports its file format.

To close a file, just click the round, red button in the upper-left corner of its window. Keep in mind that closing a file will not necessarily quit the application too. To quit an application, choose Quit from the application menu or press Command-Q.

Folders
Folders on your Mac are used to organize your file and applications.

 
 File appearances may differ a little from each other depending on what type of file they are and what they contain

Your Documents folder (in the Finder sidebar under Favorites) will contain all documents that you create. The Finder sidebar includes several other folders, such as Movies, Music, and Pictures, to help keep all your files organized by type. The Applications folder contains all your applications and the Desktop folder contains all the stuff that’s currently on your desktop.

Organizing files and folders
If you want to add more folders to set up an organizational scheme, here’s how to create a new folder:

  1. Make the Finder active (click the desktop, click inside any Finder window, or click the Finder icon in the Dock).
  2. From the File menu, choose New Folder; a new “untitled folder” icon appears in the active Finder window.
  3. Name your folder by simply typing a name in the highlighted text box next to the folder icon.

Or, you can simply press the Shift-Command-N key combination.

To organize your files and folders, drag any file, folder, or application that you want into your new folder, or drag the folder into any other folder to establish an organized hierarchy.

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