Dock – Mac101 – Get one to one with your Mac ! http://mac.101.freemac.org Tue, 10 Jan 2017 11:49:57 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.6 Dock Tips http://mac.101.freemac.org/dock-tips/ Wed, 04 Jan 2017 10:09:00 +0000 http://osx.tips.onemac.net/?p=10840 The Dock is the bar of icons that sits at the bottom or side of your screen. It provides easy access to many of the apps that come with your Mac (like MailSafari, and Messages). You can add your own apps, documents and folders to the Dock, too.

image of the Dock

To use an item in the Dock, click its icon. If you want to listen to some music, click the iTunes icon (the icon with music notes) to open iTunes. To check your email, click the Mail icon (it looks like a stamp).

When an application is open, the Dock displays an illuminated dash beneath the application’s icon. To make any currently running application the active one, click its icon in the Dock.

Organizing the Dock

The Dock keeps apps on its left side. Folders, documents, and minimized windows are kept on the right side of the Dock. If you look closely, you can see a vertical separator line that separates these two sides.

the trash icon in the dock

If you want to rearrange where an icon appears on the Dock, just drag it to another location in the Dock. The Trash and the Finder are special items, so they are always present at each end of the Dock.

Adding and removing Dock items

If you want to add an application to the Dock, click the Launchpad icon in the Dock. Then, drag an app icon from the Launchpad to the Dock. The icons in the Dock move aside to make room for the new item. If you want to add a file or folder to the Dock, just drag its icon from any Finder window (or the desktop) and drop it on the Dock.

To remove an item from the Dock, drag its icon an inch or more off the Dock and wait a couple seconds. Then release the icon and it disappears in a poof of smoke.

dragging an icon off the Dock

Removing an item from the Dock doesn’t permanently remove it from your computer. If you want that item back in the Dock, locate the app, file, or folder in the Finder or Launchpad, and simply drag it back into the Dock.

Learn more

To learn more about the Dock, click a topic below. You can also search for the word “Dock” from the Help menu at the top of your screen.

Minimizing Windows

If you minimize a window (click the round, yellow button in the upper-left corner of any window), the window is pulled down into the Dock. It’s held there until you click its icon to bring up the window again.

 

Stacks

You can also choose how to display folders in the Dock. You can either view them as a folder icon, or as a stack.

dock stack

Stacks display a folder’s contents as a fan or grid when you click them in the Dock. Learn more about Stacks here.

 

The Trash

The Dock includes the Trash (its icon looks like a waste basket). Drag any documents you no longer want to the Trash to get rid of them.

When you move items to the Trash, you haven’t completely deleted them. You can click the Trash icon in the Dock to see what it contains. When you’re ready to permanently delete files or folders that you’ve dragged to the Trash, click and hold the Trash icon in the Dock and choose Empty Trash.

the trash icon in the dock

If you drag a disk or other mounted volume to the Trash, it changes to an eject icon to let you know that this action ejects or removes the item rather than erasing or deleting it.

eject icon in dock

 

If you don’t see the Dock

You can also set the Dock so that it isn’t visible until you need it. If you don’t see the dock, try moving your pointer to the bottom or side of your screen to see if it appears. To turn Dock hiding on or off, choose Dock > Turn Hiding On or Turn Hiding Off from the Apple () menu.

 

]]>
The Dock on Multiple Displays http://mac.101.freemac.org/the-dock-on-multiple-displays/ Wed, 22 Jan 2014 20:08:56 +0000 http://10.9.onemac.org/?p=2638 In Mavericks, the Dock can automatically appear on a secondary display if you drag your mouse to the bottom of the screen on the secondary monitor (this will cause the Dock to switch displays from the primary display).

Unfortunately, this can get annoying if you’re not used to this behavior. A simple fix is to move your Dock on the primary display to one of the sides (left or right). When the Dock is positioned on the side of the screen, it will not jump between displays. You can change the positioning of the Dock in System Preferences > Dock.

]]>
Stacks http://mac.101.freemac.org/stacks/ Thu, 17 May 2012 14:18:00 +0000 http://onetip.onemac.org/2012/05/17/stacks/ A stack is a Dock item that gives you fast access to a folder. When you click a Stack, the files within spring from the Dock in a fan or a grid, depending on the number of items (or the preference you set). OS X starts you off with two default Stacks: one for downloads and the other for documents. The Downloads Stack contains files you download from Safari, Mail, and iChat. The Documents Stack is a great place to keep things such as presentations, spreadsheets, and word processing files. You can create as many Stacks as you wish simply by dragging folders to the right side of your Dock.

Tip: Within the Stack, you can click and drag on the icons in your fan or grid stack to another folder, the Trash, an external disc icon, your desktop, or other locations.

Fan
Fan Stacks shows a portion your folder content and arrange the icons so that the closest icon to the Dock is based on the order of the “Sort by” option you have selected.

For example, if you select the “Sort by” option of “Date Added”, the Fan Stack will expand showing the icons of the most recently added items closest to the Dock. This is the default setting of your Downloads folder, making it easy to open, copy or move your latest download.

Fan Stack elements

Grid
Grid Stacks will show the folder content as a matrix of icons arranged by your “Sort by” option.

Grid Stacks are scrollable and allow you to navigate folders. You can click a folder in the Stack to open that folder. An arrow button will appear in the upper left of the Stack you just opened. Click it to go back to the folder you came from. If there are more icons that can be shown, a scroll bar will appear.

Grid Stack elements

Return to parent folder arrow top-left corner. Click it to return to the parent folder.
Scroll bar – Present only when there are more icons to show.

You can customize a Stack by right-clicking or control-clicking on the stack. The customize menu will include the following options:

  1. Sort by – You can select to have items sorted by Name, Date Added, Date Modified, Date Created, or Kind.
  2. Display as – Displays the icon in the Dock as the folder’s actual icon or as a stack of icons of the folder contents.
  3. View content as – Determines what Stack type is used when you click the icon:
  4. Fan – Shows folder content in the Fan stack, organized by your sort option.
  5. Grid – Shows folder content in the Grid stack, organized by your sort option.
  6. List – Shows the folder contents as a list, organized by your sort option. Each sub-folder will open another list and so on, until you reach the end of the directory structure. To open an application or document, simply click it.
  7. Automatic – This lets Lion determine the best view content option. When there are a few items, the Fan stack is used. Once you have loaded your folder with enough items, Lion will change your view content type to the Grid stack.
]]>
Dock http://mac.101.freemac.org/dock/ Sat, 19 Dec 2009 20:39:00 +0000 http://onetip.onemac.org/2009/12/19/dock/

The One-Click Trick to Moving the Dock:

Okay, so you’re working in a program like Final Cut Pro or iMovie, which takes up every vertical inch of the screen, and when you go to adjust something near the bottom, the Dock keeps popping up.
Oh sure, you could move the Dock to where it’s anchored on the left or right side of the screen, but that just feels weird.
But what if you could move it temporarily to the left or right, and then get it back to the bottom when you close Final Cut Pro, in just one click?

Here’s how: Hold the shift key, click directly on the Dock’s divider line (on the far right side of the Dock), and drag the Dock to the left or right side of your screen. Bam! It moves over to the side.
Then, once you quit Final Cut Pro, just shift-click on that divider line and slam it back to the bottom (okay, drag it back to the bottom). A draggable Dock — is that cool or what!

Open a Web Page from the Dock:

You can fill your Dock with applications, documents, folders, and stacks. In fact, you can even add bookmarks for web pages to your Dock. Let’s say you like to keep track of the latest news about Apple. If you add the Hot News site to your Dock, you can visit it whenever you’d like with a single click. Here’s how:

1. Go to the Apple Hot News page.
2. Drag the little Apple icon just to the left of the URL in the Address bar to your Dock.

Mac OS X creates a locator icon with the name of your website. To visit the site, just click the icon. Safari launches and takes you immediately to Hot News.

Want to add another? Since you like learning more about the Mac, let’s add the Find Out How page to your Dock, as well. To do so,

1. Visit Find Out How.
2. Drag the little Apple icon just to the left of the URL in the Address bar to your Dock.

Now, when you want to learn more about using your Mac, you can Find Out How right from the Dock.

Keep an Eye on Things, Live From the Dock:

Do you like to know what’s going on “under the hood” of your Mac (stuff like your CPU usage, disk activity, memory usage — you know, total geek stuff)?
If you do, you can keep an eye on things right from within the dock using Mac OS X’s Activity Monitor. It’s found in the Applications folder, under Utilities.
Once you’ve found it, drag it into your dock, then click on it to launch it.
Once it’s launched, click-and-hold for a moment on its dock icon.
A menu will pop up, and you’ll see a dock icon menu item.
This is where you choose which activity you want to monitor from its live dock icon.
Choose it, and a live graph will appear in the dock that’s updated dynamically as you work.

Folders to Add to Your Dock:

Adding folders to the right side of your dock can be a real timesaver, and two of the most popular folders to add to the dock are your home folder and your Applications folder.
Another thing you might consider, rather than putting your entire Applications folder on your dock, is to create a new folder and put in aliases of just the applications and system add-ons (such as the Calculator, etc.) that you really use.
Then you can access these by Control-clicking on the folder in the dock and a pop-up menu will appear that looks a lot like the Apple menu from OS 9.

Dropping Text on the Dock for Fast Results:

Let’s say you’re reading an article online, and you read a sentence that you want to email to a friend. Don’t do the copy-and-paste thing. Instead, just highlight the text and drag-and-drop it right on the Mail icon in the Dock. It will open Mail and put that sentence into a new mail message. This tip also works in other Cocoa applications like TextEdit, Stickies, and Safari. For example, if you’re reading a story and want to do a Google search on something you’ve read, just highlight the text and drag-and-drop it on the Safari icon in the Dock. It will launch Safari and display the Google Search Results.

Remove an Application from the Dock:

If you’d like to reduce the number of applications from the Dock, you can do so at any time. Simply grab the icon of the document, folder, or application you’d like to remove, and drag it out of the Dock. Release the mouse button, and the item will vanish in a puff of virtual smoke.

Add an Application to the Dock:

If you enjoy the convenience of the Dock, you can make it even more useful by adding items to it you use regularly. Here, for example, you’ll find two ways to add one or more applications to your Dock.

Let’s say you’re currently using Keynote ’08, your favorite presentation software, and would like to keep it in the Dock at all times. Right-click on its icon in the Dock, and select Keep in Dock from the contextual menu that appears.

Or try this option. Open the Applications folder, grab Text Edit, and drag it to the Dock. Next time you want to use Text Edit, just click its icon in the Dock.

You can use this method to add multiple applications just as easily. In that open Applications folder, choose Calculator and Dictionary, two handy utilities, and drag both into the Dock.

Change the Position of the Dock:

Mac OS X lets you customize the Dock in a number of ways.

If you choose Dock from the Apple menu and select Dock Preferences, a dialog will open giving you access to all of the Dock customization options.

Use them to:

– change the size of the Dock
– turn Magnification On (or Off) by clicking the check box and, if On, the degree of Magnification
– indicate where you’d like the Dock to appear
– select the effect (Genie or Scale) used to minimize a window
– check the Animate box, which makes the icon for an application bounce when you open it
– check the box to have Mac OS X hide the Dock when it’s not being used

Changing the Dock Syle:

Lets get started!

Before we start, you’re going to need to design your dock style.
Now I have no tutorial made on how to do this, but this is my favorite website for dock images:

http://leoparddocks.com/

From here you can download the images you need to replace the images on your dock!

Lets Begin!

You want to go to your Mac’s HD, mine is called Tom HD.
In there you will find a folder called System that looks like this:

Once inside you’ll find a folder on its own called Library, open up the folder.

Now you will need to find a folder called “Core Services” which looks like this:

Now, look for Dock !
Once you have found it, CMD + Click it and select:
Show Package Contents – > Contents – > Resources.

You are looking for these files:
scurve-l.png – scurve-m.png – scurve-sm.png – scurve-xl.png

Select these files and make sure YOU HAVE BACKED THEM UP!

Also, in some cases you may need to back up seperator.png too.
To be on the safe side, I back it up anyway!

You’re nearly there now!

Go ahead and open the ZIP file you have downloaded from Leopard Docks (http://leoparddocks.com/), notice you have: scurve-l.png – scurve-m.png – scurve-sm.png – scurve-xl.png

You need to select those files (And sometimes, if it comes with it, the seperator.png too!)

Once you have them selected, go ahead and drag them into the Resources folder and overwrite the existing scurve PNG Files!

You’re done!

All you need to do, is restart the dock. to do this, open up Terminal
(CMD + Space – > Type Terminal – > Press Enter)

Once you’re in terminal, type:
killall Dock

Once the dock has reloaded, you should have a sweet new dock !

]]>
Using the Dock http://mac.101.freemac.org/using-the-dock/ Mon, 08 Dec 2008 21:07:00 +0000 http://onetip.onemac.org/2008/12/08/using-the-dock/ The One-Click Trick to Moving the Dock

Okay, so you’re working in a program like Final Cut Pro or iMovie, which takes up every vertical inch of the screen, and when you go to adjust something near the bottom, the Dock keeps popping up.
Oh sure, you could move the Dock to where it’s anchored on the left or right side of the screen, but that just feels weird.
But what if you could move it temporarily to the left or right, and then get it back to the bottom when you close Final Cut Pro, in just one click?

Here’s how: Hold the shift key, click directly on the Dock’s divider line (on the far right side of the Dock), and drag the Dock to the left or right side of your screen. Bam! It moves over to the side.
Then, once you quit Final Cut Pro, just shift-click on that divider line and slam it back to the bottom (okay, drag it back to the bottom). A draggable Dock — is that cool or what!

Open a Web Page from the Dock

You can fill your Dock with applications, documents, folders, and stacks. In fact, you can even add bookmarks for web pages to your Dock. Let’s say you like to keep track of the latest news about Apple. If you add the Hot News site to your Dock, you can visit it whenever you’d like with a single click. Here’s how:

1. Go to the Apple Hot News page.
2. Drag the little Apple icon just to the left of the URL in the Address bar to your Dock.

Mac OS X creates a locator icon with the name of your website. To visit the site, just click the icon. Safari launches and takes you immediately to Hot News.

Want to add another? Since you like learning more about the Mac, let’s add the Find Out How page to your Dock, as well. To do so,

1. Visit Find Out How.
2. Drag the little Apple icon just to the left of the URL in the Address bar to your Dock.

Now, when you want to learn more about using your Mac, you can Find Out How right from the Dock.

Keep an Eye on Things, Live From the Dock

Do you like to know what’s going on “under the hood” of your Mac (stuff like your CPU usage, disk activity, memory usage — you know, total geek stuff)?
If you do, you can keep an eye on things right from within the dock using Mac OS X’s Activity Monitor. It’s found in the Applications folder, under Utilities.
Once you’ve found it, drag it into your dock, then click on it to launch it.
Once it’s launched, click-and-hold for a moment on its dock icon.
A menu will pop up, and you’ll see a dock icon menu item.
This is where you choose which activity you want to monitor from its live dock icon.
Choose it, and a live graph will appear in the dock that’s updated dynamically as you work.

Folders to Add to Your Dock

Adding folders to the right side of your dock can be a real timesaver, and two of the most popular folders to add to the dock are your home folder and your Applications folder.
Another thing you might consider, rather than putting your entire Applications folder on your dock, is to create a new folder and put in aliases of just the applications and system add-ons (such as the Calculator, etc.) that you really use.
Then you can access these by Control-clicking on the folder in the dock and a pop-up menu will appear that looks a lot like the Apple menu from OS 9.

Dropping Text on the Dock for Fast Results

Let’s say you’re reading an article online, and you read a sentence that you want to email to a friend. Don’t do the copy-and-paste thing. Instead, just highlight the text and drag-and-drop it right on the Mail icon in the Dock. It will open Mail and put that sentence into a new mail message. This tip also works in other Cocoa applications like TextEdit, Stickies, and Safari. For example, if you’re reading a story and want to do a Google search on something you’ve read, just highlight the text and drag-and-drop it on the Safari icon in the Dock. It will launch Safari and display the Google Search Results.

Remove an Application from the Dock

If you’d like to reduce the number of applications from the Dock, you can do so at any time. Simply grab the icon of the document, folder, or application you’d like to remove, and drag it out of the Dock. Release the mouse button, and the item will vanish in a puff of virtual smoke.

Add an Application to the Dock

If you enjoy the convenience of the Dock, you can make it even more useful by adding items to it you use regularly. Here, for example, you’ll find two ways to add one or more applications to your Dock.

Let’s say you’re currently using Keynote ’08, your favorite presentation software, and would like to keep it in the Dock at all times. Right-click on its icon in the Dock, and select Keep in Dock from the contextual menu that appears.

Or try this option. Open the Applications folder, grab Text Edit, and drag it to the Dock. Next time you want to use Text Edit, just click its icon in the Dock.

You can use this method to add multiple applications just as easily. In that open Applications folder, choose Calculator and Dictionary, two handy utilities, and drag both into the Dock.

Change the Position of the Dock

Mac OS X lets you customize the Dock in a number of ways.

If you choose Dock from the Apple menu and select Dock Preferences, a dialog will open giving you access to all of the Dock customization options.

Use them to:

– change the size of the Dock
– turn Magnification On (or Off) by clicking the check box and, if On, the degree of Magnification
– indicate where you’d like the Dock to appear
– select the effect (Genie or Scale) used to minimize a window
– check the Animate box, which makes the icon for an application bounce when you open it
– check the box to have Mac OS X hide the Dock when it’s not being used

Changing the Dock Syle

Lets get started!

Before we start, you’re going to need to design your dock style.
Now I have no tutorial made on how to do this, but this is my favorite website for dock images:

http://leoparddocks.com/

From here you can download the images you need to replace the images on your dock!

Lets Begin!

You want to go to your Mac’s HD, mine is called Tom HD.
In there you will find a folder called System that looks like this:

Once inside you’ll find a folder on its own called Library, open up the folder.

Now you will need to find a folder called “Core Services” which looks like this:

Now, look for Dock !
Once you have found it, CMD + Click it and select:
Show Package Contents – > Contents – > Resources.

You are looking for these files:
scurve-l.png – scurve-m.png – scurve-sm.png – scurve-xl.png

Select these files and make sure YOU HAVE BACKED THEM UP!

Also, in some cases you may need to back up seperator.png too.
To be on the safe side, I back it up anyway!

You’re nearly there now!

Go ahead and open the ZIP file you have downloaded from Leopard Docks (http://leoparddocks.com/), notice you have: scurve-l.png – scurve-m.png – scurve-sm.png – scurve-xl.png

You need to select those files (And sometimes, if it comes with it, the seperator.png too!)

Once you have them selected, go ahead and drag them into the Resources folder and overwrite the existing scurve PNG Files!

You’re done!

All you need to do, is restart the dock. to do this, open up Terminal
(CMD + Space – > Type Terminal – > Press Enter)

Once you’re in terminal, type:
killall Dock

Once the dock has reloaded, you should have a sweet new dock !
]]>